Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of metastatic lesions in bone: Studies in rat and porcine models

S. Burch, A. Bogaards, Jeff Siewerdsen, D. Moseley, A. Yee, J. Finkelstein, Robert Weersink, B. C. Wilson, S. K. Bisland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study represents the first reported use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for metastatic bone lesions and specifically, as a treatment for spinal metastases. A model of bone metastasis in rat confirmed the efficacy of benzoporphyrin derivative-monoacid-mediated PDT for treating lesions within the spine and appendicular bone. Fluorimetry confirmed the selective accumulation of drug into the tumor(s) at 3 h post-injection. 48 h post-light delivery into the vertebral body of the rat spine loss of bioluminescent signal and histological analyses of sectioned spine confirmed MT-1 tumor cell kill in vivo as previously confirmed in vitro using an established cell viability assay. Porcine vertebrae provided a model comparable to that of human for light propagation and PDT response. Histological examination of vertebrae 48 h post-PDT revealed a necrotic radius of 0.6 cm with an average fluence rate of 4.3 mW/cm2. Non-necrotic tissue damage was evident up to 2 cm out from the treatment fiber. Results support the application of PDT to the treatment of primary or metastatic lesions within bone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number034011
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Photodynamic therapy
Photochemotherapy
lesions
bones
rats
Rats
therapy
Bone
Spine
Swine
spine
Bone and Bones
vertebrae
metastasis
Tumors
tumors
Cells
Neoplasm Metastasis
Therapeutics
Light

Keywords

  • Bioluminescence
  • Bone
  • Cancer
  • Dosimetry
  • Metastases
  • Photodynamic
  • Spine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of metastatic lesions in bone : Studies in rat and porcine models. / Burch, S.; Bogaards, A.; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Moseley, D.; Yee, A.; Finkelstein, J.; Weersink, Robert; Wilson, B. C.; Bisland, S. K.

In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, Vol. 10, No. 3, 034011, 05.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burch, S, Bogaards, A, Siewerdsen, J, Moseley, D, Yee, A, Finkelstein, J, Weersink, R, Wilson, BC & Bisland, SK 2005, 'Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of metastatic lesions in bone: Studies in rat and porcine models', Journal of Biomedical Optics, vol. 10, no. 3, 034011. https://doi.org/10.1117/1.1921887
Burch, S. ; Bogaards, A. ; Siewerdsen, Jeff ; Moseley, D. ; Yee, A. ; Finkelstein, J. ; Weersink, Robert ; Wilson, B. C. ; Bisland, S. K. / Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of metastatic lesions in bone : Studies in rat and porcine models. In: Journal of Biomedical Optics. 2005 ; Vol. 10, No. 3.
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