Phenotype matters the absence of a positive association between cortical thinning and chronic low back pain when controlling for salient clinical variables

Andrew J. Dolman, Marco L. Loggia, Robert R. Edwards, Randy L. Gollub, Jian Kong, Vitaly Napadow, Ajay D. Wasan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims/Objectives/Background: Studies have associated chronic low back pain (cLBP) with grey matter thinning. But these studies have not controlled for important clinical variables (such as a comorbid affective disorder, pain medication, age, or pain phenotype), which may reduce or eliminate these associations. Methods: We conducted cortical thickness and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses in 14 cLBP patients with a discogenic component to their pain, not taking opioids or benzodiazepines, and not depressed or anxious. They were age and gender matched to 14 pain-free controls (PFCs). An ROI-driven analysis (regions of interest) was conducted, using 18 clusters from a previous arterial spin labeling study demonstrating greater regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in these cLBP subjects than the PFCs. Cortical thickness and VBM-based gray matter volume measurements were obtained from a structural MRI scan and group contrasts were calculated. Results: Multivariate analysis of variance showed a trend toward cortical thickening in the right paracentral lobule in cLBP subjects (F1,17=3.667, P1,17=6.880, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)839-845
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brain morphometry
  • Chronic low back pain
  • Clinical research methods
  • Cortical thickness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

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