Phase I first-in-human clinical study of S-trans, trans- farnesylthiosalicylic acid (salirasib) in patients with solid tumors

Apostolia Maria Tsimberidou, Michelle A. Rudek, David Hong, Chaan S. Ng, Jessica Blair, Howard Goldsweig, Razelle Kurzrock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: This phase I first-in-human trial evaluated salirasib, an S-prenyl derivative of thiosalicylic acid that competitively blocks RAS signaling. Methods: Patients with advanced cancers received salirasib twice daily for 21 days every 4 weeks. Doses were escalated from 100 to 200, 400, 600, and 800 mg. Results: The most common toxicity was dose-related diarrhea (Grade 1-2, 79% of 24 patients). Other toxicities included abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. No Grade 3-4 toxicity was noted. Nineteen (79%) patients had no drug-related toxicity >Grade 1. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was not reached, but all three patients treated with 800 mg experienced Grade 1-2 diarrhea, abrogating dose escalation. Six patients were treated at a dose of 600 mg with no DLTs. Seven (29%) patients had stable disease on salirasib 4 months (range 4-23+). The salirasib pharmacokinetic profile was characterized by slow absorption and a rapid elimination phase following oral administration. Salirasib exposure (C max; day 1 AUCinf vs. day 15 AUC0-12 h) was similar between days 1 and 15 (P > 0.05). The T 1/2 (mean ± SD) was 3.6 ± 2.2 h on day 1. Conclusions: Salirasib therapy was well tolerated. The recommended dose for phase II studies is 600 mg twice daily.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-241
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • FTS
  • Pharmacokinetics
  • Phase I
  • Solid tumors
  • Toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Cancer Research
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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