Pharmacy on demand: New technologies to enable miniaturized and mobile drug manufacturing

John J. Lewin, Eugene J. Choi, Geoffrey Ling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose. Developmental pharmaceutical manufacturing systems and techniques designed to overcome the shortcomings of traditional batch processing methods are described. Summary. Conventional pharmaceutical manufacturing processes do not adequately address the needs of military and civilian patient populations and healthcare providers. Recent advances within the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Battlefield Medicine program suggest that miniaturized, flexible platforms for end-to-end manufacturing of pharmaceuticals are possible. Advances in continuous-flow synthesis, chemistry, biological engineering, and downstream processing, coupled with online analytics, automation, and enhanced process control measures, pave the way for disruptive innovation to improve the pharmaceutical supply chain and drug manufacturing base. These new technologies, along with current and ongoing advances in regulatory science, have the future potential to (1) permit "on demand" drug manufacturing on the battlefield and in other austere environments, (2) enhance the level of preparedness for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats, (3) enhance health authorities' ability to respond to natural disasters and other catastrophic events, (4) minimize shortages of drugs, (5) address gaps in the orphan drug market, (6) support and enable the continued drive toward precision medicine, and (7) enhance access to needed medications in underserved areas across the globe. Conclusion. Modular platforms under development by DARPA's Battlefield Medicine program may one day improve the safety, efficiency, and timeliness of drug manufacturing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-54
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Health-System Pharmacy
Volume73
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Technology
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Orphan Drug Production
Medicine
Bioengineering
Precision Medicine
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Automation
Disasters
Health Personnel
Safety
Health
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Pharmacy on demand : New technologies to enable miniaturized and mobile drug manufacturing. / Lewin, John J.; Choi, Eugene J.; Ling, Geoffrey.

In: American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, Vol. 73, No. 2, 15.01.2016, p. 45-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewin, John J. ; Choi, Eugene J. ; Ling, Geoffrey. / Pharmacy on demand : New technologies to enable miniaturized and mobile drug manufacturing. In: American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy. 2016 ; Vol. 73, No. 2. pp. 45-54.
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