Pharmacologic strategies in the prevention and treatment of corneal transplant rejection

Khalid F. Tabbara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Corneal transplantation remains one of the most successful organ transplantation procedures in humans. The unique structure of the cornea, with its absence of blood vessels and corneal lymphatic, allows the survival of corneal allograft. Recent advances in sutures, storage media, microsurgical instrumentation, and new pharmacological strategies have greatly improved the success of corneal transplantation and the prevention of corneal allograft rejection. Our strategies in the management and prevention of corneal graft rejection can modify and improve the survival of corneal allografts. Preoperative evaluation, understanding the risk factors, and management of ocular surface disorders may greatly improve the survival of the corneal transplant. Early recognition of corneal allograft rejection and aggressive treatment may improve the survival of the corneal graft. Furthermore, patients who undergo corneal transplantation should be maintained under close ophthalmic surveillance and patients should be informed to report immediately whenever symptoms of corneal graft rejection occur. The mainstay of therapy is topical corticosteroids. In severe cases, periocular, intravenous, and oral corticosteroids therapy can be rendered. New therapeutic modalities such as cyclosporine, tacrolimus, daclizumab, mycophenolate mofetil, leflunomide, rapamycin, and others may prove to be of help in the prevention and treatment of corneal graft rejection. Early recognition of corneal graft rejection and prompt treatment are mandatory for the successful survival of the corneal allograft.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-232
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Ophthalmology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Graft Rejection
Allografts
Corneal Transplantation
leflunomide
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Therapeutics
Mycophenolic Acid
Risk Management
Tacrolimus
Organ Transplantation
Graft Survival
Sirolimus
Cornea
Sutures
Cyclosporine
Blood Vessels
Pharmacology
Transplants
Survival

Keywords

  • Allograft
  • Autograft
  • Corneal
  • Corticosteroids
  • Graft rejection
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Pharmacologic strategies in the prevention and treatment of corneal transplant rejection. / Tabbara, Khalid F.

In: International Ophthalmology, Vol. 28, No. 3, 06.2008, p. 223-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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