Personal consequences of malpractice lawsuits on American surgeons

Charles M. Balch, Michael R. Oreskovich, Lotte N. Dyrbye, Joseph M. Colaiano, Daniel V. Satele, Jeff A. Sloan, Tait D. Shanafelt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Our objective was to identify the prevalence of recent malpractice litigation against American surgeons and evaluate associations with personal well-being. Although malpractice lawsuits are often filed against American surgeons, the personal consequences with respect to burnout, depression, and career satisfaction are poorly understood. Study Design: Members of the American College of Surgeons were sent an anonymous, cross-sectional survey in October 2010. Surgeons were asked if they had been involved in a malpractice suit during 2 previous years. The survey also evaluated demographic variables, practice characteristics, career satisfaction, burnout, and quality of life. Results: Of the approximately 25,073 surgeons sampled, 7,164 (29%) returned surveys. Involvement in a recent malpractice suit was reported by 1,764 of 7,164 (24.6%) responding surgeons. Surgeons involved in a recent malpractice suit were younger, worked longer hours, had more night call, and were more likely to be in private practice (all p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)657-667
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume213
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

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Malpractice
Private Practice
Jurisprudence
Surgeons
Cross-Sectional Studies
Quality of Life
Demography
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Balch, C. M., Oreskovich, M. R., Dyrbye, L. N., Colaiano, J. M., Satele, D. V., Sloan, J. A., & Shanafelt, T. D. (2011). Personal consequences of malpractice lawsuits on American surgeons. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 213(5), 657-667. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2011.08.005

Personal consequences of malpractice lawsuits on American surgeons. / Balch, Charles M.; Oreskovich, Michael R.; Dyrbye, Lotte N.; Colaiano, Joseph M.; Satele, Daniel V.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Shanafelt, Tait D.

In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Vol. 213, No. 5, 11.2011, p. 657-667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Balch, CM, Oreskovich, MR, Dyrbye, LN, Colaiano, JM, Satele, DV, Sloan, JA & Shanafelt, TD 2011, 'Personal consequences of malpractice lawsuits on American surgeons', Journal of the American College of Surgeons, vol. 213, no. 5, pp. 657-667. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2011.08.005
Balch, Charles M. ; Oreskovich, Michael R. ; Dyrbye, Lotte N. ; Colaiano, Joseph M. ; Satele, Daniel V. ; Sloan, Jeff A. ; Shanafelt, Tait D. / Personal consequences of malpractice lawsuits on American surgeons. In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons. 2011 ; Vol. 213, No. 5. pp. 657-667.
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