Personal and parental nativity as risk factors for food sensitization

Corinne Keet, Robert A Wood, Elizabeth C. Matsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Immigrants to developed countries have low rates of aeroallergen sensitization and asthma, but less is known about both food allergy and the role of parental immigration status. Objective: We sought to evaluate the relationship between personal and parental nativity and the risk of food sensitization. Methods: Three thousand five hundred fifty subjects less than 21 years old from the Nation Health and Examination Survey 2005-2006 were included. Odds ratios (ORs) were generated by using logistic regression, which adjusted for race/ethnicity, sex, age, and household income and accounted for the complex survey design. Nativity was classified as US-born or foreign-born, and the age of immigration was estimated. Head-of-household nativity was used as a proxy for parental nativity. Food sensitization was defined as at least 1 specific IgE level of 0.35 kU/L or greater to milk, egg, or peanut. Aeroallergen-specific sensitizations and the presence of asthma, allergic rhinitis, or eczema were also assessed. Results: Compared with those born outside the United States (US), US-born children and adolescents had higher odds of sensitization to any food (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.49-2.83; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume129
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Emigration and Immigration
Food
Asthma
Odds Ratio
Food Hypersensitivity
Eczema
Proxy
Health Surveys
Developed Countries
Immunoglobulin E
Ovum
Milk
Logistic Models
Surveys and Questionnaires
Allergic Rhinitis
Arachis

Keywords

  • aeroallergen
  • asthma
  • child
  • eczema
  • Food allergy
  • food sensitization
  • hay fever
  • immigration
  • nativity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Personal and parental nativity as risk factors for food sensitization. / Keet, Corinne; Wood, Robert A; Matsui, Elizabeth C.

In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 129, No. 1, 01.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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