Persistent socioeconomic disparities in cardiovascular risk factors and health in the United States: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2002-2013

Javier Valero-Elizondo, Jonathan C. Hong, Erica S. Spatz, Joseph A. Salami, Nihar R. Desai, Jamal S. Rana, Rohan Khera, Salim S. Virani, Ron Blankstein, Michael Blaha, Khurram Nasir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and aims: Socioeconomic status (SES) has been linked to worse cardiovascular risk factor (CRF) profiles and higher rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD), with an especially high burden of disease for low-income groups. We aimed to describe the trends in prevalence of CRFs among US adults by SES from 2002 to 2013. Methods: Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey was analyzed. CRFs (obesity, diabetes, hypertension, physical inactivity, smoking and hypercholesterolemia), were ascertained by ICD-9-CM and/or self-report. Results: The proportion of individuals with obesity, diabetes and hypertension increased overall, with low-income groups representing a higher prevalence for each CRF. Of note, physical inactivity had the highest prevalence increase, with the "lowest-income" group observing a relative percent increase of 71.1%. Conclusions: Disparities in CRF burden continue to increase, across SES groups. Strategies to potentially eliminate the persistent health disparities gap may include a shift to greater coverage for prevention, and efforts to engage in healthy lifestyle behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAtherosclerosis
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

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Health Expenditures
Social Class
Health
Obesity
Hypertension
International Classification of Diseases
Hypercholesterolemia
Self Report
Cardiovascular Diseases
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Epidemiology
  • Health disparities
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Persistent socioeconomic disparities in cardiovascular risk factors and health in the United States : Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2002-2013. / Valero-Elizondo, Javier; Hong, Jonathan C.; Spatz, Erica S.; Salami, Joseph A.; Desai, Nihar R.; Rana, Jamal S.; Khera, Rohan; Virani, Salim S.; Blankstein, Ron; Blaha, Michael; Nasir, Khurram.

In: Atherosclerosis, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Valero-Elizondo, Javier ; Hong, Jonathan C. ; Spatz, Erica S. ; Salami, Joseph A. ; Desai, Nihar R. ; Rana, Jamal S. ; Khera, Rohan ; Virani, Salim S. ; Blankstein, Ron ; Blaha, Michael ; Nasir, Khurram. / Persistent socioeconomic disparities in cardiovascular risk factors and health in the United States : Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2002-2013. In: Atherosclerosis. 2017.
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