Persistent genital arousal disorder: Treatment by neurolysis of dorsal branch of pudendal nerve

Kevin Klifto, A. Lee Dellon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) is a woman's perception that she is in a state of sexual arousal, without the ability of arousal to be satisfied by orgasm. It is the hypothesis of this study that PGAD results from a minimal degree of nerve compression of the dorsal branch of the pudendal nerve. If this is true, PGAD could be treated by neurolysis of the dorsal branch of the pudendal nerve. Methods: A retrospective chart review from 2010 through 2018, of those women having neurolysis of the dorsal branch of the pudendal nerve for PGAD. The main outcome measures were the pre-operative and post-operative changes in clitoral symptoms (arousal, numbness, pain). Results: Eight women included in this study were followed more than 26 weeks since surgery (mean = 65, range = 26–144 weeks). Seven of these women had the surgery bilaterally, and each of these had an excellent result, meaning elimination of the arousal symptoms, and the ability to resume normal sexual intercourse. The patient with unilateral decompression of the dorsal branch of the pudendal nerve was the only patient who had some, versus complete improvement in arousal symptoms. Of the seven women that had pain, six had complete relief and one had partial relief. No major surgical complications were observed. Conclusion: The relief of arousal symptoms by neurolysis of the dorsal nerve to the clitoris supports the hypothesis that PGAD is due to a minimal degree of compression of the dorsal branch of the pudendal nerve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-166
Number of pages7
JournalMicrosurgery
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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