Persistent and recurrent tinea corporis in children treated with combination antifungal/corticosteroid agents

Sharonda J. Alston, Bernard A Cohen, Marisa Braun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. Combination antifungal/corticosteroid preparations are widely used by nondermatologists in the treatment of superficial fungal infections in patients of all ages. Over half of the prescriptions written for the most commonly used combination agent clotrimazole 1%/betamethasone diproprionate 0.05% cream (Lotrisone, Schering, Kenilworth, NJ) were prescribed for children younger than 4 years old. Our pediatric dermatology division has recently encountered a series of children with recurrent or persistent tinea corporis, especially tinea faciei, treated initially with combination antifungal/corticosteroid cream. Methods. All children evaluated for tinea corporis in a university hospital pediatric dermatology clinic from January through June 2001 were identified from the clinic registry for a retrospective chart review. Response to therapy was confirmed by telephone survey and/or follow-up visits at least 1 month after clearing of infection. Results. Six children ranging in age from 4 to 11 years were evaluated for tinea corporis in a pediatric dermatology clinic at our institution during the 6-month period. All 6 children were diagnosed clinically by their pediatrician with tinea corporis and initially treated with clotrimazole 1%/betamethasone diproprionate 0.05% cream for 2 to 12 months. In our pediatric dermatology clinic, patients had their diagnosis confirmed with a positive potassium hydroxide preparation and were treated with one of several oral or topical antifungal agents with clearing of all tinea infections. Conclusion. The use of combination clotrimazole 1% cream/betamethasone diproprionate 0.05% cream (Lotrisone) for the treatment of tinea corporis may be associated with persistent/recurrent infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-203
Number of pages3
JournalPediatrics
Volume111
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tinea
Antifungal Agents
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Dermatology
Clotrimazole
Betamethasone
Pediatrics
Infection
Mycoses
Telephone
Prescriptions
Registries
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Combination antifungal
  • Corticosteroid cream
  • Persistent
  • Recurrent
  • Therapy
  • Tinea corporis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Persistent and recurrent tinea corporis in children treated with combination antifungal/corticosteroid agents. / Alston, Sharonda J.; Cohen, Bernard A; Braun, Marisa.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 111, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 201-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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