Persistence of hepatitis B viral DNA after serological recovery from hepatitis B virus infection

Hubert E. Blum, T. Jake Liang, Eithan Galun, Jack R. Wands

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major medical problem worldwide. Apart from HBsAg carriers, hepatitis B virus has also been identified in some HBsAg- individuals with or without antibodies to viral antigens. The molecular mechanisms underlying hepatitis B virus persistence in HBsAg- individuals are unresolved, however. To identify a possible genetic basis for viral persistence, we cloned the viral genome from the liver of a patient serologically immune to hepatitis B virus infection. DNA sequence analysis of the complete viral genome identified numerous mutations in all viral genes. Analysis of the biological effects of these mutations revealed three major findings: a low level of HBsAg synthesis, absence of HBeAg production and a defect terminating viral replication. These data suggest that mutations accumulating during the natural course of hepatitis B virus infection may be a mechanism underlying viral persistence in HBsAg-individuals, presumably through escape from immune surveillance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-63
Number of pages8
JournalHepatology
Volume14
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Viral DNA
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis B virus
Viral Genome
Mutation
Hepatitis B e Antigens
Viral Genes
Viral Antigens
Chronic Hepatitis B
DNA Sequence Analysis
Antibodies
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Blum, H. E., Liang, T. J., Galun, E., & Wands, J. R. (1991). Persistence of hepatitis B viral DNA after serological recovery from hepatitis B virus infection. Hepatology, 14(1), 56-63.

Persistence of hepatitis B viral DNA after serological recovery from hepatitis B virus infection. / Blum, Hubert E.; Liang, T. Jake; Galun, Eithan; Wands, Jack R.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 14, No. 1, 07.1991, p. 56-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blum, HE, Liang, TJ, Galun, E & Wands, JR 1991, 'Persistence of hepatitis B viral DNA after serological recovery from hepatitis B virus infection', Hepatology, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 56-63.
Blum, Hubert E. ; Liang, T. Jake ; Galun, Eithan ; Wands, Jack R. / Persistence of hepatitis B viral DNA after serological recovery from hepatitis B virus infection. In: Hepatology. 1991 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 56-63.
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