Perioperatively Inhaled Hydrogen Gas Diminishes Neurologic Injury Following Experimental Circulatory Arrest in Swine

Alexis R. Cole, Dorothy A. Perry, Ali Raza, Arthur P. Nedder, Elizabeth Pollack, William L. Regan, Sarah J. van den Bosch, Brian D. Polizzotti, Edward Yang, Daniel Davila, Onur Afacan, Simon K. Warfield, Yangming Ou, Brenda Sefton, Allen D Everett, Jeffrey J. Neil, Hart G.W. Lidov, John E. Mayer, John N. Kheir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study used a swine model of mildly hypothermic prolonged circulatory arrest and found that the addition of 2.4% inhaled hydrogen gas to inspiratory gases during and after the ischemic insult significantly decreased neurologic and renal injury compared with controls. With proper precautions, inhalational hydrogen may be administered safely through conventional ventilators and may represent a complementary therapy that can be easily incorporated into current workflows. In the future, inhaled hydrogen may diminish the sequelae of ischemia that occurs in congenital heart surgery, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal life-support events, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and organ transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-187
Number of pages12
JournalJACC: Basic to Translational Science
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Nervous System Trauma
Hydrogen
Swine
Gases
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Workflow
Organ Transplantation
Mechanical Ventilators
Complementary Therapies
Heart Arrest
Thoracic Surgery
Ischemia
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Kidney

Keywords

  • circulatory arrest
  • hydrogen gas
  • ischemia-reperfusion injury
  • neuroprotection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Perioperatively Inhaled Hydrogen Gas Diminishes Neurologic Injury Following Experimental Circulatory Arrest in Swine. / Cole, Alexis R.; Perry, Dorothy A.; Raza, Ali; Nedder, Arthur P.; Pollack, Elizabeth; Regan, William L.; van den Bosch, Sarah J.; Polizzotti, Brian D.; Yang, Edward; Davila, Daniel; Afacan, Onur; Warfield, Simon K.; Ou, Yangming; Sefton, Brenda; Everett, Allen D; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Lidov, Hart G.W.; Mayer, John E.; Kheir, John N.

In: JACC: Basic to Translational Science, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 176-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cole, AR, Perry, DA, Raza, A, Nedder, AP, Pollack, E, Regan, WL, van den Bosch, SJ, Polizzotti, BD, Yang, E, Davila, D, Afacan, O, Warfield, SK, Ou, Y, Sefton, B, Everett, AD, Neil, JJ, Lidov, HGW, Mayer, JE & Kheir, JN 2019, 'Perioperatively Inhaled Hydrogen Gas Diminishes Neurologic Injury Following Experimental Circulatory Arrest in Swine', JACC: Basic to Translational Science, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 176-187. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacbts.2018.11.006
Cole, Alexis R. ; Perry, Dorothy A. ; Raza, Ali ; Nedder, Arthur P. ; Pollack, Elizabeth ; Regan, William L. ; van den Bosch, Sarah J. ; Polizzotti, Brian D. ; Yang, Edward ; Davila, Daniel ; Afacan, Onur ; Warfield, Simon K. ; Ou, Yangming ; Sefton, Brenda ; Everett, Allen D ; Neil, Jeffrey J. ; Lidov, Hart G.W. ; Mayer, John E. ; Kheir, John N. / Perioperatively Inhaled Hydrogen Gas Diminishes Neurologic Injury Following Experimental Circulatory Arrest in Swine. In: JACC: Basic to Translational Science. 2019 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 176-187.
@article{688511ce52c34de5826a41a086467300,
title = "Perioperatively Inhaled Hydrogen Gas Diminishes Neurologic Injury Following Experimental Circulatory Arrest in Swine",
abstract = "This study used a swine model of mildly hypothermic prolonged circulatory arrest and found that the addition of 2.4{\%} inhaled hydrogen gas to inspiratory gases during and after the ischemic insult significantly decreased neurologic and renal injury compared with controls. With proper precautions, inhalational hydrogen may be administered safely through conventional ventilators and may represent a complementary therapy that can be easily incorporated into current workflows. In the future, inhaled hydrogen may diminish the sequelae of ischemia that occurs in congenital heart surgery, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal life-support events, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and organ transplantation.",
keywords = "circulatory arrest, hydrogen gas, ischemia-reperfusion injury, neuroprotection",
author = "Cole, {Alexis R.} and Perry, {Dorothy A.} and Ali Raza and Nedder, {Arthur P.} and Elizabeth Pollack and Regan, {William L.} and {van den Bosch}, {Sarah J.} and Polizzotti, {Brian D.} and Edward Yang and Daniel Davila and Onur Afacan and Warfield, {Simon K.} and Yangming Ou and Brenda Sefton and Everett, {Allen D} and Neil, {Jeffrey J.} and Lidov, {Hart G.W.} and Mayer, {John E.} and Kheir, {John N.}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jacbts.2018.11.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "176--187",
journal = "JACC: Basic to Translational Science",
issn = "2452-302X",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perioperatively Inhaled Hydrogen Gas Diminishes Neurologic Injury Following Experimental Circulatory Arrest in Swine

AU - Cole, Alexis R.

AU - Perry, Dorothy A.

AU - Raza, Ali

AU - Nedder, Arthur P.

AU - Pollack, Elizabeth

AU - Regan, William L.

AU - van den Bosch, Sarah J.

AU - Polizzotti, Brian D.

AU - Yang, Edward

AU - Davila, Daniel

AU - Afacan, Onur

AU - Warfield, Simon K.

AU - Ou, Yangming

AU - Sefton, Brenda

AU - Everett, Allen D

AU - Neil, Jeffrey J.

AU - Lidov, Hart G.W.

AU - Mayer, John E.

AU - Kheir, John N.

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - This study used a swine model of mildly hypothermic prolonged circulatory arrest and found that the addition of 2.4% inhaled hydrogen gas to inspiratory gases during and after the ischemic insult significantly decreased neurologic and renal injury compared with controls. With proper precautions, inhalational hydrogen may be administered safely through conventional ventilators and may represent a complementary therapy that can be easily incorporated into current workflows. In the future, inhaled hydrogen may diminish the sequelae of ischemia that occurs in congenital heart surgery, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal life-support events, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and organ transplantation.

AB - This study used a swine model of mildly hypothermic prolonged circulatory arrest and found that the addition of 2.4% inhaled hydrogen gas to inspiratory gases during and after the ischemic insult significantly decreased neurologic and renal injury compared with controls. With proper precautions, inhalational hydrogen may be administered safely through conventional ventilators and may represent a complementary therapy that can be easily incorporated into current workflows. In the future, inhaled hydrogen may diminish the sequelae of ischemia that occurs in congenital heart surgery, cardiac arrest, extracorporeal life-support events, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and organ transplantation.

KW - circulatory arrest

KW - hydrogen gas

KW - ischemia-reperfusion injury

KW - neuroprotection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064461749&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064461749&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jacbts.2018.11.006

DO - 10.1016/j.jacbts.2018.11.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 31061920

AN - SCOPUS:85064461749

VL - 4

SP - 176

EP - 187

JO - JACC: Basic to Translational Science

JF - JACC: Basic to Translational Science

SN - 2452-302X

IS - 2

ER -