Perioperative predictors of morbidity following hepatic resection for neoplasm: A multivariate analysis of a single surgeon experience with 105 patients

James V. Sitzmann, Peter S. Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Factors that predict mortality or morbidity risk in consecutive hepatic resections for neoplasm were examined, with controlled variables of surgical technique and experience. Summary Background Data: Hepatic resection has become the therapy of choice for the management of metastatic or primary neoplasms of the liver. Although mortality for this procedure has steadily decreased, associated morbidity remains high. Methods: One hundred five patients undergoing hepatic resection for malignancy over a 4-year period by a single surgeon to identify preoperative, intraoperative, or postoperative predictors of morbid outcomes were studied. Variables were analyzed using multiple regression in a stepwise, logistic model. Results: Sixty-day hospital mortality was 2.8%, with morbidity occurring in 33%. A significant preoperative predictor of morbidity was serum bilirubin (p > 0.005). Notably, preoperative renal function, or medical illness, did not increase morbid risk. Operative variables increasing risk included extent of resection, blood loss, and operative time (p > 0.005). Conclusions: Complex hepatic resection can be performed with low mortality, and serum bilirubin is the single most powerful predictor of postoperative complication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-17
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of surgery
Volume219
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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