Perioperative goal-directed therapy and postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing high-risk abdominal surgery: A historical-prospective, comparative effectiveness study

Maxime Cannesson, Davinder Ramsingh, Joseph Rinehart, Aram Demirjian, Trung Vu, Shermeen Vakharia, David Imagawa, Zhaoxia Yu, Sheldon Greenfield, Zeev Kain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Perioperative goal-directed therapy (PGDT) may improve postoperative outcome in high-risk surgery patients but its adoption has been slow. In 2012, we initiated a performance improvement (PI) project focusing on the implementation of PGDT during high-risk abdominal surgeries. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this intervention. Methods: This is a historical prospective quality improvement study. The goal of this initiative was to standardize the way fluid management and hemodynamic optimization are conducted during high-risk abdominal surgery in the Departments of Anesthesiology and Surgery at the University of California Irvine. For fluid management, the protocol consisted in standardized baseline crystalloid administration of 3 ml/kg/hour and any additional boluses based on PGDT. The impact of the intervention was assessed on the length of stay in the hospital (LOS) and post-operative complications (NSQIP database). Results: In the 1 year pre- and post-implementation periods, 128 and 202 patients were included. The average volume of fluid administered during the case was 9.9 (7.1-13.0) ml/kg/hour in the pre-implementation period and 6.6 (4.7-9.5) ml/kg/hour in the post-implementation period (p < 0.01). LOS decreased from 10 (6-16) days to 7 (5-11) days (p = 0.0001). Based on the multiple linear regression analysis, the estimated coefficient for intervention was 0.203 (SE = 0.054, p = 0.0002) indicating that, with the other conditions being held the same, introducing intervention reduced LOS by 18 % (95 % confidence interval 9-27 %). The incidence of NSQIP complications decreased from 39 % to 25 % (p = 0.04). Conclusion: These results suggest that the implementation of a PI program focusing on the implementation of PGDT can transform fluid administration patterns and improve postoperative outcome in patients undergoing high-risk abdominal surgeries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number261
JournalCritical Care
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 19 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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