Periodontal disease, sleep duration, and white blood cell markers in the 2009 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

Hind A. Beydoun, Sharmin Hossain, May A. Beydoun, Jordan Weiss, Alan B. Zonderman, Shaker M. Eid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Elevated levels of inflammatory biomarkers are consistently associated with chronic conditions, for which periodontitis and sleep are established risk factors. We examined the relationships between periodontitis, hours of sleep and white blood cell (WBC) markers among a nationally representative sample of US adults. Methods: Cross-sectional study using existing demographic, examination, laboratory and questionnaire data on 11,813 participants (5,814 men and 5,999 women, mean age ± SE; range: 52.74 ± 0.24; 30 to 80 years) from the 2009 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Unadjusted, sex- and age-adjusted, as well as fully adjusted linear and logistic regression models were conducted in addition to generalized structural equations models, while considering sampling design complexity. β, odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals, indirect effects and mediation proportions were estimated. Results: The weighted mean WBC count was 7,130 cells/µL, with the WBC 5-part differential estimated in terms of percentages of lymphocytes (29.50%), monocytes (7.99%), neutrophils (59.03%), eosinophils (2.84%), and basophils (71.88%). Furthermore, 36.2% of participants reported <7 hours of sleep and 49.8% had periodontitis. In fully adjusted models controlling for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health characteristics, neither WBC markers nor periodontitis were related to hours of sleep. By contrast, periodontitis was directly related to WBC count and %neutrophils and inversely related to %lymphocytes, especially among men. However, the relationship of periodontitis with %neutrophils and %lymphocytes may be modified by hours of sleep, as it was specific to individuals reporting ≥7 hours of sleep. Conclusion: Periodontitis may be directly related to WBC count and %neutrophils and inversely related to %lymphocytes, especially among men and individuals reporting ≥7 hours of sleep, with implications for primary and secondary prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)582-595
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of periodontology
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Keywords

  • inflammation
  • leukocytes
  • periodontitis
  • sleep
  • surveys and questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Periodontics

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