Perfusion defect size predicts engraftment but not early retention of intra-myocardially injected cardiosphere-derived cells after acute myocardial infarction

Riikka Lautamäki, John Terrovitis, Michael Bonios, Jianhua Yu, Benjamin M. Tsui, M. Roselle Abraham, Frank M. Bengel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Therapeutic cell retention and engraftment are critical for myocardial regeneration. Underlying mechanisms, including the role of tissue perfusion, are not well understood. In Wistar Kyoto rats, syngeneic cardiospherederived cells (CDCs) were injected intramyocardially, after experimental myocardial infarction. CDCs were labeled with [ 18F]-FDG (n = 7), for quantification of 1-h retention, or with sodium-iodide-symporter gene (NIS; n = 8), for detection of 24-h engraftment by reporter imaging. Perfusion was imaged simultaneously. Infarct size was 37 ± 9 and 38 ± 9% of LV in FDG and NIS groups. Cell signal was located in the infarct border zone in all animals. No significant relationship was observed between infarct size and 1-h CDC retention (r = -0.65; P = 0.11). However, infarct size correlated significantly with 24-h engraftment (r = 0.75; P = 0.03). Residual perfusion at the injection site was not related to cell retention/engraftment. Larger infarcts are associated with improved CDC engraftment. This observation encourages further investigation of microenvironmental conditions after ischemic damage and their role in therapeutic cell survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1379-1386
Number of pages8
JournalBasic Research in Cardiology
Volume106
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

Keywords

  • Cardiosphere-derived cells
  • Cell tracking
  • Myocardial perfusion
  • Myocardial regeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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