Perceptions of parenting practices as predictors of aggression in a low-income, Urban, predominately African American middle school sample

Kantahyanee W. Murray, Denise L. Haynie, Donna E. Howard, Tina L. Cheng, Bruce Simons-Morton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research examined the relation between early adolescent aggression and parenting practices in an urban, predominately African American sample. Sixth graders (N = 209) completed questionnaires about their overt and relational aggressive behaviors and perceptions of caregivers' parenting practices. Findings indicated that moderate levels of parental expectations for peaceful solutions at Time 1 were associated with a lower likelihood of overt aggression at Time 2. Furthermore, findings suggest that when caregivers' support and knowledge of adolescents' whereabouts were relatively low or when caregivers' exerted high psychological control, moderate levels of parental expectations for peaceful solutions protected early adolescents against engagement in both overt and relational aggression. The implications of the findings for schools and other youth violence prevention settings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-193
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of School Violence
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010

Keywords

  • Low-income schools
  • Minority population
  • Parenting
  • Urban
  • Youth aggression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

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