Perceptions of One's Neighborhood and Mammogram Use among a Sample of Low-Income Women at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Sexually Transmitted Infections

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Neighborhood disorder, signs of physical and social disorganization, has been related to a range of poor mental and physical health outcomes. Although individual factors have been widely associated with getting a mammogram, little is known about the impact of the neighborhood environment on a woman's decision to get a mammogram. Methods: In a sample of women at risk for human immunodeficiency virus and sexually transmitted infections, we explored the role of perceptions of one's neighborhood on getting a mammogram. The study included two samples: women 40 to 49 years (= 233) and women 50 years and older (= 83). Data were collected from May 2006 through June 2008. Results: Women age 50 years and older who lived in a neighborhood with disorder were 72% less likely to get a mammogram compared with women who lived in neighborhoods without disorder. There was no relationship for women age 40 to 49 years. Conclusions: Interventions are needed to increase awareness and encourage women living in neighborhoods with disorder to get a mammogram. In addition to interventions to increase mammography, programs are needed to decrease neighborhood disorder. Increasing neighborhood cohesion, social control, and empowerment could integrate health promotion programs to both reduce disorder and increase health behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196-200
Number of pages5
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

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