Perception of CPR quality: Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role

International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Many healthcare providers rely on visual perception to guide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but little is known about the accuracy of provider perceptions of CPR quality. We aimed to describe the difference between perceived versus measured CPR quality, and to determine the impact of provider role, real-time visual CPR feedback and Just-in-Time (JIT) CPR training on provider perceptions. Methods: We conducted secondary analyses of data collected from a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial of 324 healthcare providers who participated in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario between July 2012 and April 2014. Participants were randomized to one of four permutations of: JIT CPR training and real-time visual CPR feedback. We calculated the difference between perceived and measured quality of CPR and reported the proportion of subjects accurately estimating the quality of CPR within each study arm. Results: Participants overestimated achieving adequate chest compression depth (mean difference range: 16.1-60.6%) and rate (range: 0.2-51%), and underestimated chest compression fraction (0.2-2.9%) across all arms. Compared to no intervention, the use of real-time feedback and JIT CPR training (alone or in combination) improved perception of depth (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-50
Number of pages7
JournalResuscitation
Volume87
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Health Personnel
Arm
Thorax
Depth Perception
Visual Perception
Heart Arrest
Multicenter Studies

Keywords

  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Chest compressions
  • Perception
  • Quality
  • Resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Emergency
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators (2015). Perception of CPR quality: Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role. Resuscitation, 87, 44-50. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.11.015

Perception of CPR quality : Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role. / International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators.

In: Resuscitation, Vol. 87, 01.02.2015, p. 44-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators 2015, 'Perception of CPR quality: Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role', Resuscitation, vol. 87, pp. 44-50. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.11.015
International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators. Perception of CPR quality: Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role. Resuscitation. 2015 Feb 1;87:44-50. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.11.015
International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators. / Perception of CPR quality : Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role. In: Resuscitation. 2015 ; Vol. 87. pp. 44-50.
@article{9e81dce51c274eb19edaee8fc03c33cc,
title = "Perception of CPR quality: Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role",
abstract = "Aim: Many healthcare providers rely on visual perception to guide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but little is known about the accuracy of provider perceptions of CPR quality. We aimed to describe the difference between perceived versus measured CPR quality, and to determine the impact of provider role, real-time visual CPR feedback and Just-in-Time (JIT) CPR training on provider perceptions. Methods: We conducted secondary analyses of data collected from a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial of 324 healthcare providers who participated in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario between July 2012 and April 2014. Participants were randomized to one of four permutations of: JIT CPR training and real-time visual CPR feedback. We calculated the difference between perceived and measured quality of CPR and reported the proportion of subjects accurately estimating the quality of CPR within each study arm. Results: Participants overestimated achieving adequate chest compression depth (mean difference range: 16.1-60.6{\%}) and rate (range: 0.2-51{\%}), and underestimated chest compression fraction (0.2-2.9{\%}) across all arms. Compared to no intervention, the use of real-time feedback and JIT CPR training (alone or in combination) improved perception of depth (p",
keywords = "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Chest compressions, Perception, Quality, Resuscitation",
author = "{International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators} and Adam Cheng and Frank Overly and David Kessler and Nadkarni, {Vinay M.} and Yiqun Lin and Quynh Doan and Duff, {Jonathan P.} and Tofil, {Nancy M.} and Farhan Bhanji and Mark Adler and Alex Charnovich and Elizabeth Hunt and Brown, {Linda L.} and Jennifer Davidson and Peterson, {Dawn Taylor} and White, {Marjorie Lee} and John Zhong and Vincent Grant and David Grant and Stephanie Sudikoff and Kimberly Marohn and Nicola Robertson and Jordan Duval-Arnould and Ilana Bank and Ronald Gottesman and Hubert Wong and Aaron Donoghue and Sutton, {Robert M.} and Dana Niles and Jenny Chatfield and Nnenna Chime",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.11.015",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "87",
pages = "44--50",
journal = "Resuscitation",
issn = "0300-9572",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perception of CPR quality

T2 - Influence of CPR feedback, Just-in-Time CPR training and provider role

AU - International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators

AU - Cheng, Adam

AU - Overly, Frank

AU - Kessler, David

AU - Nadkarni, Vinay M.

AU - Lin, Yiqun

AU - Doan, Quynh

AU - Duff, Jonathan P.

AU - Tofil, Nancy M.

AU - Bhanji, Farhan

AU - Adler, Mark

AU - Charnovich, Alex

AU - Hunt, Elizabeth

AU - Brown, Linda L.

AU - Davidson, Jennifer

AU - Peterson, Dawn Taylor

AU - White, Marjorie Lee

AU - Zhong, John

AU - Grant, Vincent

AU - Grant, David

AU - Sudikoff, Stephanie

AU - Marohn, Kimberly

AU - Robertson, Nicola

AU - Duval-Arnould, Jordan

AU - Bank, Ilana

AU - Gottesman, Ronald

AU - Wong, Hubert

AU - Donoghue, Aaron

AU - Sutton, Robert M.

AU - Niles, Dana

AU - Chatfield, Jenny

AU - Chime, Nnenna

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Aim: Many healthcare providers rely on visual perception to guide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but little is known about the accuracy of provider perceptions of CPR quality. We aimed to describe the difference between perceived versus measured CPR quality, and to determine the impact of provider role, real-time visual CPR feedback and Just-in-Time (JIT) CPR training on provider perceptions. Methods: We conducted secondary analyses of data collected from a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial of 324 healthcare providers who participated in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario between July 2012 and April 2014. Participants were randomized to one of four permutations of: JIT CPR training and real-time visual CPR feedback. We calculated the difference between perceived and measured quality of CPR and reported the proportion of subjects accurately estimating the quality of CPR within each study arm. Results: Participants overestimated achieving adequate chest compression depth (mean difference range: 16.1-60.6%) and rate (range: 0.2-51%), and underestimated chest compression fraction (0.2-2.9%) across all arms. Compared to no intervention, the use of real-time feedback and JIT CPR training (alone or in combination) improved perception of depth (p

AB - Aim: Many healthcare providers rely on visual perception to guide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but little is known about the accuracy of provider perceptions of CPR quality. We aimed to describe the difference between perceived versus measured CPR quality, and to determine the impact of provider role, real-time visual CPR feedback and Just-in-Time (JIT) CPR training on provider perceptions. Methods: We conducted secondary analyses of data collected from a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial of 324 healthcare providers who participated in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario between July 2012 and April 2014. Participants were randomized to one of four permutations of: JIT CPR training and real-time visual CPR feedback. We calculated the difference between perceived and measured quality of CPR and reported the proportion of subjects accurately estimating the quality of CPR within each study arm. Results: Participants overestimated achieving adequate chest compression depth (mean difference range: 16.1-60.6%) and rate (range: 0.2-51%), and underestimated chest compression fraction (0.2-2.9%) across all arms. Compared to no intervention, the use of real-time feedback and JIT CPR training (alone or in combination) improved perception of depth (p

KW - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation

KW - Chest compressions

KW - Perception

KW - Quality

KW - Resuscitation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84920924153&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84920924153&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.11.015

DO - 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2014.11.015

M3 - Article

C2 - 25433294

AN - SCOPUS:84920924153

VL - 87

SP - 44

EP - 50

JO - Resuscitation

JF - Resuscitation

SN - 0300-9572

ER -