Perceived transparency and fairness of the organ allocation system and willingness to donate organs: A national study

Leigh Boulware, M. U. Troll, Nae Yuh Wang, N. R. Powe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The influence of perceptions of organ allocation on willingness to donate organs is unclear. We performed a national study assessing the relation of public perceptions of organ allocation to willingness to donate organs, and we assessed the contribution of beliefs regarding discrimination in health care to observed associations. Among 845 participants, a majority (65%) reported that they less than "mostly" understand allocation, and most (71%) reported that they believe allocation is "unfair" or are "unsure" of its fairness. Participants reporting less understanding were less willing to donate (56%) than persons reporting greater understanding (67%) (p <0.01). Participants believing allocation is "unfair" or who are "unsure" about fairness were less willing to donate (54%) than persons believing allocation is "fair" (68%) (p <0.01). Associations were stronger among certain demographic subgroups. Participants with the least favorable perceptions of allocation were more likely than their counterparts to believe that race and income discrimination occur in transplantation and to believe that they personally experienced income discrimination in health care. Adjustment for these beliefs partially attenuated associations between perceptions regarding allocation and willingness to donate. Interventions enhancing transparency and perceived fairness of organ allocation may improve willingness to donate, particularly if they address concerns regarding discrimination in transplantation and health care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1778-1787
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Fingerprint

Delivery of Health Care
Transplantation
Public Relations
Demography

Keywords

  • Allocation
  • Donation
  • Fairness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Perceived transparency and fairness of the organ allocation system and willingness to donate organs : A national study. / Boulware, Leigh; Troll, M. U.; Wang, Nae Yuh; Powe, N. R.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 7, No. 7, 07.2007, p. 1778-1787.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{bf92975a06244e849d9df80997c67c22,
title = "Perceived transparency and fairness of the organ allocation system and willingness to donate organs: A national study",
abstract = "The influence of perceptions of organ allocation on willingness to donate organs is unclear. We performed a national study assessing the relation of public perceptions of organ allocation to willingness to donate organs, and we assessed the contribution of beliefs regarding discrimination in health care to observed associations. Among 845 participants, a majority (65{\%}) reported that they less than {"}mostly{"} understand allocation, and most (71{\%}) reported that they believe allocation is {"}unfair{"} or are {"}unsure{"} of its fairness. Participants reporting less understanding were less willing to donate (56{\%}) than persons reporting greater understanding (67{\%}) (p <0.01). Participants believing allocation is {"}unfair{"} or who are {"}unsure{"} about fairness were less willing to donate (54{\%}) than persons believing allocation is {"}fair{"} (68{\%}) (p <0.01). Associations were stronger among certain demographic subgroups. Participants with the least favorable perceptions of allocation were more likely than their counterparts to believe that race and income discrimination occur in transplantation and to believe that they personally experienced income discrimination in health care. Adjustment for these beliefs partially attenuated associations between perceptions regarding allocation and willingness to donate. Interventions enhancing transparency and perceived fairness of organ allocation may improve willingness to donate, particularly if they address concerns regarding discrimination in transplantation and health care.",
keywords = "Allocation, Donation, Fairness",
author = "Leigh Boulware and Troll, {M. U.} and Wang, {Nae Yuh} and Powe, {N. R.}",
year = "2007",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1111/j.1600-6143.2007.01848.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "1778--1787",
journal = "American Journal of Transplantation",
issn = "1600-6135",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perceived transparency and fairness of the organ allocation system and willingness to donate organs

T2 - A national study

AU - Boulware, Leigh

AU - Troll, M. U.

AU - Wang, Nae Yuh

AU - Powe, N. R.

PY - 2007/7

Y1 - 2007/7

N2 - The influence of perceptions of organ allocation on willingness to donate organs is unclear. We performed a national study assessing the relation of public perceptions of organ allocation to willingness to donate organs, and we assessed the contribution of beliefs regarding discrimination in health care to observed associations. Among 845 participants, a majority (65%) reported that they less than "mostly" understand allocation, and most (71%) reported that they believe allocation is "unfair" or are "unsure" of its fairness. Participants reporting less understanding were less willing to donate (56%) than persons reporting greater understanding (67%) (p <0.01). Participants believing allocation is "unfair" or who are "unsure" about fairness were less willing to donate (54%) than persons believing allocation is "fair" (68%) (p <0.01). Associations were stronger among certain demographic subgroups. Participants with the least favorable perceptions of allocation were more likely than their counterparts to believe that race and income discrimination occur in transplantation and to believe that they personally experienced income discrimination in health care. Adjustment for these beliefs partially attenuated associations between perceptions regarding allocation and willingness to donate. Interventions enhancing transparency and perceived fairness of organ allocation may improve willingness to donate, particularly if they address concerns regarding discrimination in transplantation and health care.

AB - The influence of perceptions of organ allocation on willingness to donate organs is unclear. We performed a national study assessing the relation of public perceptions of organ allocation to willingness to donate organs, and we assessed the contribution of beliefs regarding discrimination in health care to observed associations. Among 845 participants, a majority (65%) reported that they less than "mostly" understand allocation, and most (71%) reported that they believe allocation is "unfair" or are "unsure" of its fairness. Participants reporting less understanding were less willing to donate (56%) than persons reporting greater understanding (67%) (p <0.01). Participants believing allocation is "unfair" or who are "unsure" about fairness were less willing to donate (54%) than persons believing allocation is "fair" (68%) (p <0.01). Associations were stronger among certain demographic subgroups. Participants with the least favorable perceptions of allocation were more likely than their counterparts to believe that race and income discrimination occur in transplantation and to believe that they personally experienced income discrimination in health care. Adjustment for these beliefs partially attenuated associations between perceptions regarding allocation and willingness to donate. Interventions enhancing transparency and perceived fairness of organ allocation may improve willingness to donate, particularly if they address concerns regarding discrimination in transplantation and health care.

KW - Allocation

KW - Donation

KW - Fairness

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34250215267&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34250215267&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2007.01848.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2007.01848.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 17524080

AN - SCOPUS:34250215267

VL - 7

SP - 1778

EP - 1787

JO - American Journal of Transplantation

JF - American Journal of Transplantation

SN - 1600-6135

IS - 7

ER -