Perceived risk of developing smoking-related disease among persons living with HIV

Lauren R. Pacek, F. Joseph McClernon, Olga Rass, Maggie M. Sweizter, Matthew W. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Perceived risk of smoking is associated with smoking status, interest in quitting, cessation attempts, and quit success. Research is needed to explore risk perceptions of developing smoking-related disease among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Data came from 267 HIV-positive smokers who completed an online survey assessing perceived health risks associated with (a) generic smoking status; (b) generic non-smoking status; (c) their own personal current smoking; and (d) a hypothetical situation in which they were a non-smoker. PLWH perceived greater risk associated with their current smoking versus hypothetical personal non-smoking (p’s < 0.001), and greater risks associated with generic smoking status compared with their current smoking (p’s < 0.001). Being on HIV medication (β = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.17, 1.12), interest in quitting smoking (β = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.45, 1.32), and having an HIV healthcare provider who has recommended cessation (β = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.42, 1.67) were positively associated with perceived risk of developing smoking-related diseases. Findings have implications for developing targeted interventions to correct misperceptions regarding the health risks of smoking among PLWH, a population at particular risk for smoking and smoking-related morbidity and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1329-1334
Number of pages6
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2018

Keywords

  • Amazon Mechanical Turk
  • HIV
  • Smoking
  • risk perception
  • tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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