Perceived mental health status of drug users with HIV: Concordance between caregivers and care recipient reports and associations with caregiving burden and reciprocity

Mary M. Mitchell, Allysha C. Robinson, Jennifer Wolff, Amy Ruth Knowlton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Because caregivers' monitoring of care recipients' mental health status likely facilitates provision of needed forms of assistance, the current study examines relationship factors associated with agreement in caregiverand recipient self-reports of recipients' mental health status. Participants were former or current injection drug using persons with HIV/AIDS and their main caregivers (N = 258 dyads). Care recipients completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale and caregivers responded to a single item rating their recipients' mental health. Nearly two-thirds (64.7 %) of dyads agreed on care recipients' mental health status (j = .26, p\.001). More secondary stressors of care, less reciprocity, and care recipients' greater physical limitations, substance use, and younger age predicted greater agreement on recipients' having poorer mental health. Greater secondary stressors and lower income were associated with less agreement on care recipients' mental health. Findings, which suggest that promoting reciprocity and alleviating secondary stressors of caregiving may help facilitate these caregivers' improved assessment of their care recipients' mental health status, have implications to dyadic approaches to promote drug users' HIV health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1103-1113
Number of pages11
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Drug Users
Caregivers
Health Status
Mental Health
HIV
Secondary Care
Self Report
Epidemiologic Studies
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Depression
Injections
Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Depression and mental health
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Informal caregiving or caregiver
  • Measurement concordance
  • Relationship reciprocity
  • Substance/drug abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "Because caregivers' monitoring of care recipients' mental health status likely facilitates provision of needed forms of assistance, the current study examines relationship factors associated with agreement in caregiverand recipient self-reports of recipients' mental health status. Participants were former or current injection drug using persons with HIV/AIDS and their main caregivers (N = 258 dyads). Care recipients completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale and caregivers responded to a single item rating their recipients' mental health. Nearly two-thirds (64.7 {\%}) of dyads agreed on care recipients' mental health status (j = .26, p\.001). More secondary stressors of care, less reciprocity, and care recipients' greater physical limitations, substance use, and younger age predicted greater agreement on recipients' having poorer mental health. Greater secondary stressors and lower income were associated with less agreement on care recipients' mental health. Findings, which suggest that promoting reciprocity and alleviating secondary stressors of caregiving may help facilitate these caregivers' improved assessment of their care recipients' mental health status, have implications to dyadic approaches to promote drug users' HIV health outcomes.",
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