Perceived benefit of a telemedicine consultative service in a highly staffed intensive care unit

Mark Romig, Asad Latif, Randeep S. Gill, Peter J. Pronovost, Adam Sapirstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a nocturnal telemedicine service improves culture, staff satisfaction, and perceptions of quality of care in a highly staffed university critical care system. Methods: We conducted an experiment to determine the effect of telemedicine on nursing-staff satisfaction and perceptions of the quality of care in an intensive care unit (ICU). We surveyed ICU nurses using a modified version of a previously validated tool before deployment and after a 2-month experimental program of tele-ICU. Nurses in another, similar ICU within the same hospital academic medical center served as concurrent controls for the survey responses. Results: Survey responses were measured using a 5-point Likert scale, and results were analyzed using paired t testing. Survey responses of the nurses in the intervention ICU (n = 27) improved significantly after implementation of the tele-ICU program in the relations and communication subscale (2.99 ± 1.13 pre vs 3.27 ±1.27 post, P <.01), the psychological working conditions and burnout subscale (3.10 ± 1.10 pre vs 3.23 ± 1.11 post, P <.02), and the education subscale (3.52 ± 0.84 pre vs 3.76± 0.78 post, P <.03). In contrast, responses in the control ICU (n = 11) declined in the patient care and perceived effectiveness (3.94 ± 0.80 pre vs 3.48 ± 0.86 post, P <.01) and the education (3.95 ± 0.39 pre vs 3.50 ± 0.80 post, P <.05) subscales. Conclusion: Telemedicine has the potential to improve staff satisfaction and communication in highly staffed ICUs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Critical Care
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Telemedicine
Intensive Care Units
Quality of Health Care
Nurses
Communication
Education
Nursing Staff
Critical Care
Patient Care
Psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Attitude of health personnel
  • Health care surveys
  • Job satisfaction
  • Organizational culture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Perceived benefit of a telemedicine consultative service in a highly staffed intensive care unit. / Romig, Mark; Latif, Asad; Gill, Randeep S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Sapirstein, Adam.

In: Journal of Critical Care, Vol. 27, No. 4, 08.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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