Perceived and objective measures of the food store environment and the association with weight and diet among low-income women in North Carolina

Alison A. Gustafson, Joseph Sharkey, Carmen D. Samuel-Hodge, Jesse Jones-Smith, Mary Cordon Folds, Jianwen Cai, Alice S. Ammerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective The present study aimed to highlight the similarities and differences between perceived and objective measures of the food store environment among low-income women and the association with diet and weight.Design Cross-sectional analysis of food store environment. Store level was characterized by: (i) the availability of healthy foods in stores where participants shop, using food store audits (objective); and (ii) summary scores of self-reported perception of availability of healthy foods in stores (perceived). Neighbourhood level was characterized by: (i) the number and type of food stores within the census tract (objective); and (2) summary scores of self-reported perception of availability of healthy foods (perceived).Setting Six counties in North Carolina.Subjects One hundred and eighty-six low-income women.Results Individuals who lived in census tracts with a convenience store and a supercentre had higher odds of perceiving their neighbourhood high in availability of healthy foods (OR = 687 (95 % CI 261, 1801)) than individuals with no store. Overall, as the number of healthy foods available in the store decreased, the probability of perceiving that store high in availability of healthy foods increased. Individuals with a supercentre in their census tract weighed more (240 (95 % CI 066, 415) kg/m2) than individuals without one. At the same time, those who lived in a census tract with a supercentre and a convenience store consumed fewer servings of fruits and vegetables (122 (95 % CI 240, 004)).Conclusions The study contributes to a growing body of research aiming to understand how the food store environment is associated with weight and diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1032-1038
Number of pages7
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Diet
Weights and Measures
Food
Censuses
Vegetables
Fruit
Cross-Sectional Studies
Research

Keywords

  • Environment
  • Food
  • Objective
  • Perceived

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Gustafson, A. A., Sharkey, J., Samuel-Hodge, C. D., Jones-Smith, J., Folds, M. C., Cai, J., & Ammerman, A. S. (2010). Perceived and objective measures of the food store environment and the association with weight and diet among low-income women in North Carolina. Public Health Nutrition, 14(6), 1032-1038. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980011000115

Perceived and objective measures of the food store environment and the association with weight and diet among low-income women in North Carolina. / Gustafson, Alison A.; Sharkey, Joseph; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D.; Jones-Smith, Jesse; Folds, Mary Cordon; Cai, Jianwen; Ammerman, Alice S.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 14, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 1032-1038.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gustafson, Alison A. ; Sharkey, Joseph ; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D. ; Jones-Smith, Jesse ; Folds, Mary Cordon ; Cai, Jianwen ; Ammerman, Alice S. / Perceived and objective measures of the food store environment and the association with weight and diet among low-income women in North Carolina. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 14, No. 6. pp. 1032-1038.
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