Peptic ulcer with massive hemorrhage in the upper age groups

Elmer Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The problem of massive upper gastro-intestinal hemorrhage secondary to gastric and duodenal ulcers in the upper age groups is becoming more common as the life span of the human being lengthens. Welch and co-workers (1) in 1955 stated that "massive hemorrhage from duodenal ulcer is 15 times more frequent in patients over 70 than it was in 1922 to 1932." Berkowitz and associates (2) found that peptic ulcer of the stomach, duodenum or anastomosis was the cause of acute gastro-intestinal hemorrhage in 75 per cent of 500 cases, and that 43 per cent of these patients were over the age of 50 years. Although a great deal has been written on this subject, it is difficult to compare results. Many articles treat all causes of gastro-intestinal hemorrhage together (e.g., gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, esophageal varices, esophageal hiatus hernia, or gastritis). However, when each of these entities is handled separately, the result varies from disease to disease. Moreover, the breakdown should be in terms of medical versus surgical therapy. The definition of the term massive hemorrhage is another source of confusion. There has been no attempt to evaluate each cause of massive gastro-intestinal hemorrhage separately for the various age groups. This paper is an effort to analyze the cases of massive upper gastro-intestinal hemorrhage secondary to gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer in the upper age groups. By defining massive hemorrhage in specific terms, by limiting and separating the diagnoses, and by studying the various upper age groups separately, it is hoped that this study may serve as a basis of comparison with other series. It is felt that knowledge of the results of medical versus surgical handling would be of great aid in the management of these cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-335
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1958

Fingerprint

Peptic Ulcer
Age Groups
Hemorrhage
Duodenal Ulcer
Stomach Ulcer
Hiatal Hernia
Esophageal and Gastric Varices
Case Management
Gastritis
Duodenum
Stomach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Peptic ulcer with massive hemorrhage in the upper age groups. / Hoffman, Elmer.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 6, No. 4, 01.04.1958, p. 324-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3c5f6d2c7b0a42d09d3fbe2697ea6b19,
title = "Peptic ulcer with massive hemorrhage in the upper age groups",
abstract = "The problem of massive upper gastro-intestinal hemorrhage secondary to gastric and duodenal ulcers in the upper age groups is becoming more common as the life span of the human being lengthens. Welch and co-workers (1) in 1955 stated that {"}massive hemorrhage from duodenal ulcer is 15 times more frequent in patients over 70 than it was in 1922 to 1932.{"} Berkowitz and associates (2) found that peptic ulcer of the stomach, duodenum or anastomosis was the cause of acute gastro-intestinal hemorrhage in 75 per cent of 500 cases, and that 43 per cent of these patients were over the age of 50 years. Although a great deal has been written on this subject, it is difficult to compare results. Many articles treat all causes of gastro-intestinal hemorrhage together (e.g., gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, esophageal varices, esophageal hiatus hernia, or gastritis). However, when each of these entities is handled separately, the result varies from disease to disease. Moreover, the breakdown should be in terms of medical versus surgical therapy. The definition of the term massive hemorrhage is another source of confusion. There has been no attempt to evaluate each cause of massive gastro-intestinal hemorrhage separately for the various age groups. This paper is an effort to analyze the cases of massive upper gastro-intestinal hemorrhage secondary to gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer in the upper age groups. By defining massive hemorrhage in specific terms, by limiting and separating the diagnoses, and by studying the various upper age groups separately, it is hoped that this study may serve as a basis of comparison with other series. It is felt that knowledge of the results of medical versus surgical handling would be of great aid in the management of these cases.",
author = "Elmer Hoffman",
year = "1958",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1532-5415.1958.tb00724.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "324--335",
journal = "Journal of the American Geriatrics Society",
issn = "0002-8614",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Peptic ulcer with massive hemorrhage in the upper age groups

AU - Hoffman, Elmer

PY - 1958/4/1

Y1 - 1958/4/1

N2 - The problem of massive upper gastro-intestinal hemorrhage secondary to gastric and duodenal ulcers in the upper age groups is becoming more common as the life span of the human being lengthens. Welch and co-workers (1) in 1955 stated that "massive hemorrhage from duodenal ulcer is 15 times more frequent in patients over 70 than it was in 1922 to 1932." Berkowitz and associates (2) found that peptic ulcer of the stomach, duodenum or anastomosis was the cause of acute gastro-intestinal hemorrhage in 75 per cent of 500 cases, and that 43 per cent of these patients were over the age of 50 years. Although a great deal has been written on this subject, it is difficult to compare results. Many articles treat all causes of gastro-intestinal hemorrhage together (e.g., gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, esophageal varices, esophageal hiatus hernia, or gastritis). However, when each of these entities is handled separately, the result varies from disease to disease. Moreover, the breakdown should be in terms of medical versus surgical therapy. The definition of the term massive hemorrhage is another source of confusion. There has been no attempt to evaluate each cause of massive gastro-intestinal hemorrhage separately for the various age groups. This paper is an effort to analyze the cases of massive upper gastro-intestinal hemorrhage secondary to gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer in the upper age groups. By defining massive hemorrhage in specific terms, by limiting and separating the diagnoses, and by studying the various upper age groups separately, it is hoped that this study may serve as a basis of comparison with other series. It is felt that knowledge of the results of medical versus surgical handling would be of great aid in the management of these cases.

AB - The problem of massive upper gastro-intestinal hemorrhage secondary to gastric and duodenal ulcers in the upper age groups is becoming more common as the life span of the human being lengthens. Welch and co-workers (1) in 1955 stated that "massive hemorrhage from duodenal ulcer is 15 times more frequent in patients over 70 than it was in 1922 to 1932." Berkowitz and associates (2) found that peptic ulcer of the stomach, duodenum or anastomosis was the cause of acute gastro-intestinal hemorrhage in 75 per cent of 500 cases, and that 43 per cent of these patients were over the age of 50 years. Although a great deal has been written on this subject, it is difficult to compare results. Many articles treat all causes of gastro-intestinal hemorrhage together (e.g., gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, esophageal varices, esophageal hiatus hernia, or gastritis). However, when each of these entities is handled separately, the result varies from disease to disease. Moreover, the breakdown should be in terms of medical versus surgical therapy. The definition of the term massive hemorrhage is another source of confusion. There has been no attempt to evaluate each cause of massive gastro-intestinal hemorrhage separately for the various age groups. This paper is an effort to analyze the cases of massive upper gastro-intestinal hemorrhage secondary to gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer in the upper age groups. By defining massive hemorrhage in specific terms, by limiting and separating the diagnoses, and by studying the various upper age groups separately, it is hoped that this study may serve as a basis of comparison with other series. It is felt that knowledge of the results of medical versus surgical handling would be of great aid in the management of these cases.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70449183650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=70449183650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1532-5415.1958.tb00724.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1532-5415.1958.tb00724.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 13525140

AN - SCOPUS:70449183650

VL - 6

SP - 324

EP - 335

JO - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

SN - 0002-8614

IS - 4

ER -