Pediatric loss of control eating syndrome: Association with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and impulsivity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Despite data linking Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and adult binge eating, there are limited data in children with loss of control (LOC) eating. We examined inhibitory control in children with LOC eating syndrome (LOC-ES) and its association with ADHD. Method 79 children (8-14 years) over the fifth weight percentile were recruited, irrespective of LOC eating or ADHD status. The Eating Disorder Examination for Children and the Standard Pediatric Eating Episode Interview assessed LOC-ES. ADHD diagnosis was determined by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for children and Conners-3 (Parent Report) DSM-IV Scales of Inattention and/or Hyperactivity (T score>65). The Go/No-Go (GNG) Task and the Behavior Regulation Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) assessed impulse control. Results Odds of LOC-ES were increased 12 times for children with ADHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 12.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.11, 51.64, p <0.001), after adjusting for BMI z scores and relevant covariates. Children had 1.17 times higher odds of reporting LOC-ES with every 5% increase in GNG Commission Rate (aOR = 1.17, CI = 1.01, 1.36, p <0.05) and 1.25 times higher odds of reporting LOC-ES with every 5 unit T-score increase in BRIEF Inhibit Scale (aOR = 1.25, CI = 1.04, 1.50, p <0.05). Discussion Children with ADHD had significantly greater odds of LOC-ES compared to children without ADHD. Children with LOC-ES had significantly greater impulse control deficits on performance-based neuropsychological assessments and on parent reports than children without LOC-ES. These findings suggest a need to investigate possible shared mechanisms such as impulse control deficits, among children with LOC-ES and ADHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)580-588
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Impulsive Behavior
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Eating
Pediatrics
Odds Ratio
Executive Function
Confidence Intervals
Equipment and Supplies
Bulimia
Mood Disorders
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Schizophrenia
Appointments and Schedules
Interviews

Keywords

  • attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • binge eating
  • eating disorder
  • impulsivity
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{cdd360920a144ebdbb99ddc50a38c7af,
title = "Pediatric loss of control eating syndrome: Association with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and impulsivity",
abstract = "Objective Despite data linking Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and adult binge eating, there are limited data in children with loss of control (LOC) eating. We examined inhibitory control in children with LOC eating syndrome (LOC-ES) and its association with ADHD. Method 79 children (8-14 years) over the fifth weight percentile were recruited, irrespective of LOC eating or ADHD status. The Eating Disorder Examination for Children and the Standard Pediatric Eating Episode Interview assessed LOC-ES. ADHD diagnosis was determined by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for children and Conners-3 (Parent Report) DSM-IV Scales of Inattention and/or Hyperactivity (T score>65). The Go/No-Go (GNG) Task and the Behavior Regulation Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) assessed impulse control. Results Odds of LOC-ES were increased 12 times for children with ADHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 12.68, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 3.11, 51.64, p <0.001), after adjusting for BMI z scores and relevant covariates. Children had 1.17 times higher odds of reporting LOC-ES with every 5{\%} increase in GNG Commission Rate (aOR = 1.17, CI = 1.01, 1.36, p <0.05) and 1.25 times higher odds of reporting LOC-ES with every 5 unit T-score increase in BRIEF Inhibit Scale (aOR = 1.25, CI = 1.04, 1.50, p <0.05). Discussion Children with ADHD had significantly greater odds of LOC-ES compared to children without ADHD. Children with LOC-ES had significantly greater impulse control deficits on performance-based neuropsychological assessments and on parent reports than children without LOC-ES. These findings suggest a need to investigate possible shared mechanisms such as impulse control deficits, among children with LOC-ES and ADHD.",
keywords = "attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, binge eating, eating disorder, impulsivity, obesity",
author = "Shauna Reinblatt and Mahone, {Ernest M} and Marian Tanofsky-Kraff and Lee-Winn, {Angela E.} and Gayane Yenokyan and Leoutsakos, {Jeannie-Marie S} and Moran, {Timothy H} and Guarda, {Angela S} and Riddle, {Mark A}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/eat.22404",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "48",
pages = "580--588",
journal = "International Journal of Eating Disorders",
issn = "0276-3478",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "6",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Pediatric loss of control eating syndrome

T2 - Association with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and impulsivity

AU - Reinblatt, Shauna

AU - Mahone, Ernest M

AU - Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

AU - Lee-Winn, Angela E.

AU - Yenokyan, Gayane

AU - Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S

AU - Moran, Timothy H

AU - Guarda, Angela S

AU - Riddle, Mark A

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Objective Despite data linking Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and adult binge eating, there are limited data in children with loss of control (LOC) eating. We examined inhibitory control in children with LOC eating syndrome (LOC-ES) and its association with ADHD. Method 79 children (8-14 years) over the fifth weight percentile were recruited, irrespective of LOC eating or ADHD status. The Eating Disorder Examination for Children and the Standard Pediatric Eating Episode Interview assessed LOC-ES. ADHD diagnosis was determined by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for children and Conners-3 (Parent Report) DSM-IV Scales of Inattention and/or Hyperactivity (T score>65). The Go/No-Go (GNG) Task and the Behavior Regulation Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) assessed impulse control. Results Odds of LOC-ES were increased 12 times for children with ADHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 12.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.11, 51.64, p <0.001), after adjusting for BMI z scores and relevant covariates. Children had 1.17 times higher odds of reporting LOC-ES with every 5% increase in GNG Commission Rate (aOR = 1.17, CI = 1.01, 1.36, p <0.05) and 1.25 times higher odds of reporting LOC-ES with every 5 unit T-score increase in BRIEF Inhibit Scale (aOR = 1.25, CI = 1.04, 1.50, p <0.05). Discussion Children with ADHD had significantly greater odds of LOC-ES compared to children without ADHD. Children with LOC-ES had significantly greater impulse control deficits on performance-based neuropsychological assessments and on parent reports than children without LOC-ES. These findings suggest a need to investigate possible shared mechanisms such as impulse control deficits, among children with LOC-ES and ADHD.

AB - Objective Despite data linking Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and adult binge eating, there are limited data in children with loss of control (LOC) eating. We examined inhibitory control in children with LOC eating syndrome (LOC-ES) and its association with ADHD. Method 79 children (8-14 years) over the fifth weight percentile were recruited, irrespective of LOC eating or ADHD status. The Eating Disorder Examination for Children and the Standard Pediatric Eating Episode Interview assessed LOC-ES. ADHD diagnosis was determined by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for children and Conners-3 (Parent Report) DSM-IV Scales of Inattention and/or Hyperactivity (T score>65). The Go/No-Go (GNG) Task and the Behavior Regulation Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) assessed impulse control. Results Odds of LOC-ES were increased 12 times for children with ADHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 12.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.11, 51.64, p <0.001), after adjusting for BMI z scores and relevant covariates. Children had 1.17 times higher odds of reporting LOC-ES with every 5% increase in GNG Commission Rate (aOR = 1.17, CI = 1.01, 1.36, p <0.05) and 1.25 times higher odds of reporting LOC-ES with every 5 unit T-score increase in BRIEF Inhibit Scale (aOR = 1.25, CI = 1.04, 1.50, p <0.05). Discussion Children with ADHD had significantly greater odds of LOC-ES compared to children without ADHD. Children with LOC-ES had significantly greater impulse control deficits on performance-based neuropsychological assessments and on parent reports than children without LOC-ES. These findings suggest a need to investigate possible shared mechanisms such as impulse control deficits, among children with LOC-ES and ADHD.

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KW - impulsivity

KW - obesity

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