Pediatric hospital medicine core competencies

Development and methodology

Erin R. Stucky, Mary C. Ottolini, Jennifer Maniscalco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Pediatric hospital medicine is the most rapidly growing site-based pediatric specialty. There are over 2500 unique members in the three core societies in which pediatric hospitalists are members: the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM). Pediatric hospitalists are fulfilling both clinical and system improvement roles within varied hospital systems. Defined expectations and competencies for pediatric hospitalists are needed. Methods: In 2005, SHM's Pediatric Core Curriculum Task Force initiated the project and formed the editorial board. Over the subsequent four years, multiple pediatric hospitalists belonging to the AAP, APA, or SHM contributed to the content of and guided the development of the project. Editors and collaborators created a framework for identifying appropriate competency content areas. Content experts from both within and outside of pediatric hospital medicine participated as contributors. A number of selected national organizations and societies provided valuable feedback on chapters. The final product was validated by formal review from the AAP, APA, and SHM. Results: The Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies were created. They include 54 chapters divided into four sections: Common Clinical Diagnoses and Conditions, Core Skills, Specialized Clinical Services, and Healthcare Systems: Supporting and Advancing Child Health. Each chapter can be used independently of the others. Chapters follow the knowledge, skills, and attitudes educational curriculum format, and have an additional section on systems organization and improvement to reflect the pediatric hospitalist's responsibility to advance systems of care. Conclusion: These competencies provide a foundation for the creation of pediatric hospital medicine curricula and serve to standardize and improve inpatient training practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-343
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Hospital Medicine
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hospital Medicine
Pediatric Hospitals
Pediatrics
Hospitalists
Curriculum
Clinical Competence
Advisory Committees

Keywords

  • Child
  • Competency
  • Curriculum
  • Hospital medicine
  • Hospitalist
  • Methodology
  • Pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

Cite this

Pediatric hospital medicine core competencies : Development and methodology. / Stucky, Erin R.; Ottolini, Mary C.; Maniscalco, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Hospital Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 6, 01.07.2010, p. 339-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cc9785a9b9d04cbfa7a2c16e0c692d49,
title = "Pediatric hospital medicine core competencies: Development and methodology",
abstract = "Background: Pediatric hospital medicine is the most rapidly growing site-based pediatric specialty. There are over 2500 unique members in the three core societies in which pediatric hospitalists are members: the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM). Pediatric hospitalists are fulfilling both clinical and system improvement roles within varied hospital systems. Defined expectations and competencies for pediatric hospitalists are needed. Methods: In 2005, SHM's Pediatric Core Curriculum Task Force initiated the project and formed the editorial board. Over the subsequent four years, multiple pediatric hospitalists belonging to the AAP, APA, or SHM contributed to the content of and guided the development of the project. Editors and collaborators created a framework for identifying appropriate competency content areas. Content experts from both within and outside of pediatric hospital medicine participated as contributors. A number of selected national organizations and societies provided valuable feedback on chapters. The final product was validated by formal review from the AAP, APA, and SHM. Results: The Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies were created. They include 54 chapters divided into four sections: Common Clinical Diagnoses and Conditions, Core Skills, Specialized Clinical Services, and Healthcare Systems: Supporting and Advancing Child Health. Each chapter can be used independently of the others. Chapters follow the knowledge, skills, and attitudes educational curriculum format, and have an additional section on systems organization and improvement to reflect the pediatric hospitalist's responsibility to advance systems of care. Conclusion: These competencies provide a foundation for the creation of pediatric hospital medicine curricula and serve to standardize and improve inpatient training practices.",
keywords = "Child, Competency, Curriculum, Hospital medicine, Hospitalist, Methodology, Pediatric",
author = "Stucky, {Erin R.} and Ottolini, {Mary C.} and Jennifer Maniscalco",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jhm.843",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "339--343",
journal = "Journal of hospital medicine (Online)",
issn = "1553-5606",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pediatric hospital medicine core competencies

T2 - Development and methodology

AU - Stucky, Erin R.

AU - Ottolini, Mary C.

AU - Maniscalco, Jennifer

PY - 2010/7/1

Y1 - 2010/7/1

N2 - Background: Pediatric hospital medicine is the most rapidly growing site-based pediatric specialty. There are over 2500 unique members in the three core societies in which pediatric hospitalists are members: the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM). Pediatric hospitalists are fulfilling both clinical and system improvement roles within varied hospital systems. Defined expectations and competencies for pediatric hospitalists are needed. Methods: In 2005, SHM's Pediatric Core Curriculum Task Force initiated the project and formed the editorial board. Over the subsequent four years, multiple pediatric hospitalists belonging to the AAP, APA, or SHM contributed to the content of and guided the development of the project. Editors and collaborators created a framework for identifying appropriate competency content areas. Content experts from both within and outside of pediatric hospital medicine participated as contributors. A number of selected national organizations and societies provided valuable feedback on chapters. The final product was validated by formal review from the AAP, APA, and SHM. Results: The Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies were created. They include 54 chapters divided into four sections: Common Clinical Diagnoses and Conditions, Core Skills, Specialized Clinical Services, and Healthcare Systems: Supporting and Advancing Child Health. Each chapter can be used independently of the others. Chapters follow the knowledge, skills, and attitudes educational curriculum format, and have an additional section on systems organization and improvement to reflect the pediatric hospitalist's responsibility to advance systems of care. Conclusion: These competencies provide a foundation for the creation of pediatric hospital medicine curricula and serve to standardize and improve inpatient training practices.

AB - Background: Pediatric hospital medicine is the most rapidly growing site-based pediatric specialty. There are over 2500 unique members in the three core societies in which pediatric hospitalists are members: the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM). Pediatric hospitalists are fulfilling both clinical and system improvement roles within varied hospital systems. Defined expectations and competencies for pediatric hospitalists are needed. Methods: In 2005, SHM's Pediatric Core Curriculum Task Force initiated the project and formed the editorial board. Over the subsequent four years, multiple pediatric hospitalists belonging to the AAP, APA, or SHM contributed to the content of and guided the development of the project. Editors and collaborators created a framework for identifying appropriate competency content areas. Content experts from both within and outside of pediatric hospital medicine participated as contributors. A number of selected national organizations and societies provided valuable feedback on chapters. The final product was validated by formal review from the AAP, APA, and SHM. Results: The Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies were created. They include 54 chapters divided into four sections: Common Clinical Diagnoses and Conditions, Core Skills, Specialized Clinical Services, and Healthcare Systems: Supporting and Advancing Child Health. Each chapter can be used independently of the others. Chapters follow the knowledge, skills, and attitudes educational curriculum format, and have an additional section on systems organization and improvement to reflect the pediatric hospitalist's responsibility to advance systems of care. Conclusion: These competencies provide a foundation for the creation of pediatric hospital medicine curricula and serve to standardize and improve inpatient training practices.

KW - Child

KW - Competency

KW - Curriculum

KW - Hospital medicine

KW - Hospitalist

KW - Methodology

KW - Pediatric

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956628141&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77956628141&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jhm.843

DO - 10.1002/jhm.843

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 339

EP - 343

JO - Journal of hospital medicine (Online)

JF - Journal of hospital medicine (Online)

SN - 1553-5606

IS - 6

ER -