Pediatric diabetes patients infrequently access outpatient psychology services following screening and referral: Implications for practice

Areti Vassilopoulos, Jessica M. Valenzuela, Joanna Tsikis, Lital Reitblat, Ernesto J. Blanco, Shelley Nicholls, Risa M. Wolf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Youth with diabetes are at risk for suboptimal psychological functioning. This study evaluated the prevalence of concerns and proportion of outpatient referrals provided and completed at follow-up. Participants included 100 adolescents and young adults seen at a multidisciplinary diabetes clinic. Referrals were made to 61.2% of participants for internalizing (51.6%), externalizing (8%), diabetes-related (50%), comprehensive evaluation (17%), interpersonal (10%), and other needs (3%). At follow-up, 23.7% of those referred were enrolled in outpatient services. Pediatric psychologists offer effective mental health screening and referral. Barriers to follow-up outpatient care included transportation, organization, and stigma. Implications for improving access are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-217
Number of pages16
JournalChildren's Health Care
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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