Pediatric contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the United States: a survey by the Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Task Force of the Society for Pediatric Radiology

Susan J. Back, Carolina Maya, Kassa Darge, Patricia T. Acharya, Carol E. Barnewolt, Jamie L. Coleman, Jonathan R. Dillman, Lynn Ansley Fordham, Misun Hwang, Annie Lim, M. Beth McCarville, Marthe M. Munden, Harriet J. Paltiel, Frank M. Volberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved an ultrasound (US) contrast agent for intravenous and intravesical administration in children. Objective: Survey the usage, interest in and barriers for contrast-enhanced US among pediatric radiologists. Materials and methods: The Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Task Force of the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR) surveyed the membership of the SPR in January 2017 regarding their current use and opinions about contrast-enhanced US in pediatrics. Results: The majority (51.1%, 166) of the 325 respondents (26.7% of 1,218) practice in either a university- or academic affiliated group. The most widely used US contrast agent was Lumason® 52.3% (23/44). While lack of expertise and training were reported barriers, all respondents who are not currently using US contrast agents are considering future use. Conclusion: Interest in pediatric contrast US is very high. Education and training are needed to support members who plan to adopt contrast US into practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Radiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 13 2018

Keywords

  • Children
  • Contrast-enhanced ultrasound
  • Lumason
  • Microbubble contrast materials
  • Optison
  • Survey
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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