Peace-building and reconciliation dividends of integrated health services delivery in post-conflict Burundi: qualitative assessments of providers and community members

Cathryn Christensen, Anbrasi Edward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While demonstrating causality remains challenging, several ‘health-peace’ mechanisms have been proposed to describe how health systems contribute to peace-building and stability in post-conflict settings. A qualitative study was undertaken in southern Burundi to identify drivers of social tension and reconciliation in the catchment area of Village Health Works, a health services organisation. Key informant interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in early 2014 with a total of one hundred and twenty community members and staff representing a range of conflict and recovery experience. Themes emerging from these interviews indicated mechanisms at the individual, household, community, and regional levels through which health provision mitigates tensions and promotes social cohesion. This peace dividend was amplified by the clinic’s integrated model, which facilitates further community interaction through economic, agricultural and education programmes. Land pressure and the marginalisation of repatriated refugees were cited as drivers of local tension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-56
Number of pages24
JournalMedicine, Conflict and Survival
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2015

Keywords

  • Burundi
  • health service delivery
  • peace-building
  • post-conflict
  • refugees

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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