Patients without ST elevation after return of spontaneous circulation may benefit from emergent percutaneous intervention: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Michael Millin, Angela C. Comer, Jose V. Nable, Peter V Johnston, Benjamin J. Lawner, Nathan Woltman, Matthew Levy, Kevin G. Seaman, Jon Mark Hirshon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Introduction The American Heart Association recommends that post-arrest patients with evidence of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) on electrocardiogram (ECG) be emergently taken to the catheterization lab for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, recommendations regarding the utility of emergent PCI for patients without ST elevation are less specific. This review examined the literature on the utility of PCI in post-arrest patients without ST elevation compared to patients with STEMI. Methods A systematic review of the English language literature was performed for all years to March 1, 2015 to examine the hypothesis that a percentage of post-cardiac arrest patients without ST elevation will benefit from emergent PCI as defined by evidence of an acute culprit coronary lesion. Results Out of 1067 articles reviewed, 11 articles were identified that allowed for analysis of data to examine our study hypothesis. These studies show that patients presenting post cardiac arrest with STEMI are thirteen times more likely to be emergently taken to the catheterization lab than patients without STEMI; OR 13.8 (95% CI 4.9–39.0). Most importantly, the cumulative data show that when taken to the catheterization lab as much as 32.2% of patients without ST elevation had an acute culprit lesion requiring intervention, compared to 71.9% of patients with STEMI; OR 0.15 (95% CI 0.06–0.34). Conclusion The results of this systematic review demonstrate that nearly one third of patients who have been successfully resuscitated from cardiopulmonary arrest without ST elevation on ECG have an acute lesion that would benefit from emergent percutaneous coronary intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-60
Number of pages7
JournalResuscitation
Volume108
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Keywords

  • Cardiopulmonary arrest
  • Meta-analysis
  • Percutaneous intervention
  • Return of spontaneous circulation
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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