Patients' preferences in choosing therapy for retinal vein occlusions

Margaret A. Chang, Howard F. Fine, Eric Bass, Susan B. Bressler, Andrew P. Schachat, Sharon D. Solomon, Neil M. Bressler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess preference values for vein occlusions with macular edema and to determine how this may affect patient perceptions of potential treatments. METHODS: The Submacular Surgery Trials Vision Preference Value Scale and questions regarding enthusiasm for potential treatments were administered to 153 patients with vein occlusion. Univariate analyses identified predictors of preference values, followed by adjustment for potential confounders using multivariate linear regression. Relationships between preference values and enthusiasm for potential treatments were assessed. RESULTS: The mean preference values ± SD were similar for patients with branch vein occlusions and central vein occlusions (0.65 ± 0.20). Lower preference values were associated with duration of occlusion of >2 years (P = 0.03) and poorer last-recorded visual acuity (P = 0.02). Approximately one half of patients were moderately or very enthusiastic about undergoing intravitreal injection. Sixty-nine percent of branch vein occlusion patients were moderately or very enthusiastic about the standard of care, laser photocoagulation; only one third of central vein occlusion patients were moderately or very enthusiastic about standard observation. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that vein occlusion with macular edema has a significant impact on quality of life. Most patients were willing to undergo potentially invasive treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)789-797
Number of pages9
JournalRetina
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

Keywords

  • Preference values
  • Quality-of-life measurements
  • Retinal vein occlusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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