Patient use of automatic blood pressure measures in retail stores: implications for diagnosis and treatment of hypertension.

C. Carolyn Thiedke, Scott Laird, D. Todd Detar, Arch G. Mainous, Keidre Jenkins, Xiaobu Ye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the simple behavior on the part of hypertensive patients of having their blood pressure checked at a retail store. We found that hypertensive patients checked their blood pressure frequently using these automated machines, believe them to be accurate, and frequently make health care decisions based on the reading they obtain. The inaccuracy of these machines is apparently not widely known. It is therefore incumbent on physicians to be aware of technologies that are in use by their patients. Patients need to be educated about the appropriate use and potential or harm that results from misuse of these technologies. Physicians might encourage their patients to invest in a home blood pressure monitor that they can bring with them to their visit to calibrate against the physician's own machine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-71
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the South Carolina Medical Association (1975)
Volume98
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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