Patient symptomatology in anal dysplasia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) is becoming increasingly advocated as a method of screening for anal dysplasia in high-risk patients. OBJECTIVE: To describe, through HRA findings, the association between patient symptomatology and anal dysplasia among patients at high risk for anal dysplasia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Univariable and multivariable analyses were conducted of data from a prospectively maintained HRA database on all patients undergoing HRA with biopsy from November 1, 2011, to March 13, 2014, at a tertiary care HRA clinic. Data included demographics, medical history and comorbidities, HIV status and related measures (CD4 cell counts, HIV viral load, and use of highly active antiretroviral therapy), sexual orientation (when available), patient symptoms at initial presentation, physical examination findings, anal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear findings. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES High-resolution anoscopy diagnosis of high-vs low-grade dysplasia or no dysplasia. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one HRA biopsy specimens (mean [SEM], 1.77 [0.11] biopsy specimens per patient) were obtained from 91 patients (mean [SEM] age, 45.7 [1.2] years; 61 men [67%]; 47 black patients [52%]; and 70 human immunodeficiencyvirus-positive patients [77%]). Twenty-seven patients (30%) had high-grade dysplasia, 26 had low-grade dysplasia (29%), and 38 had no dysplasia (42%). The majority of patients (63 [69%]) were asymptomatic (anal pain, 11 [12%]; bleeding, 14 [15%]; and pruritus, 10 [11%]). Forty-one patients (45%) presented with anal pain (odds ratio, 5.25; 95% CI, 1.44-21.82; P =.02), and patients with either high- or low-grade dysplasia were more likely to present with anal lesions on physical examination compared with patients without dysplasia (odds ratio, 4.34; 95% CI, 1.78-11.20; P =.002). Multivariable analysis suggested that anal pain was independently associated with high-grade dysplasia (odds ratio, 6.42; 95% CI, 1.18-43.3; P =.03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Anal dysplasia is a silent disease that is frequently asymptomatic. However, patients with anal pain, anal lesions, and other high-risk factors are at increased risk of having high-grade anal dysplasia. These patients may benefit from routine screening with HRA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-569
Number of pages7
JournalJAMA Surgery
Volume150
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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Pain
Odds Ratio
Biopsy
Physical Examination
HIV
Papanicolaou Test
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Tertiary Healthcare
Pruritus
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Viral Load
Sexual Behavior
Comorbidity
Demography
Databases
Hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Patient symptomatology in anal dysplasia. / Hicks, Caitlin; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Leeds, Ira L.; Efron, Jonathan; Gearhart, Susan L; Safar, Bashar; Fang, Sandy H.

In: JAMA Surgery, Vol. 150, No. 6, 01.06.2015, p. 563-569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Patient symptomatology in anal dysplasia",
abstract = "IMPORTANCE: High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) is becoming increasingly advocated as a method of screening for anal dysplasia in high-risk patients. OBJECTIVE: To describe, through HRA findings, the association between patient symptomatology and anal dysplasia among patients at high risk for anal dysplasia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Univariable and multivariable analyses were conducted of data from a prospectively maintained HRA database on all patients undergoing HRA with biopsy from November 1, 2011, to March 13, 2014, at a tertiary care HRA clinic. Data included demographics, medical history and comorbidities, HIV status and related measures (CD4 cell counts, HIV viral load, and use of highly active antiretroviral therapy), sexual orientation (when available), patient symptoms at initial presentation, physical examination findings, anal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear findings. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES High-resolution anoscopy diagnosis of high-vs low-grade dysplasia or no dysplasia. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one HRA biopsy specimens (mean [SEM], 1.77 [0.11] biopsy specimens per patient) were obtained from 91 patients (mean [SEM] age, 45.7 [1.2] years; 61 men [67{\%}]; 47 black patients [52{\%}]; and 70 human immunodeficiencyvirus-positive patients [77{\%}]). Twenty-seven patients (30{\%}) had high-grade dysplasia, 26 had low-grade dysplasia (29{\%}), and 38 had no dysplasia (42{\%}). The majority of patients (63 [69{\%}]) were asymptomatic (anal pain, 11 [12{\%}]; bleeding, 14 [15{\%}]; and pruritus, 10 [11{\%}]). Forty-one patients (45{\%}) presented with anal pain (odds ratio, 5.25; 95{\%} CI, 1.44-21.82; P =.02), and patients with either high- or low-grade dysplasia were more likely to present with anal lesions on physical examination compared with patients without dysplasia (odds ratio, 4.34; 95{\%} CI, 1.78-11.20; P =.002). Multivariable analysis suggested that anal pain was independently associated with high-grade dysplasia (odds ratio, 6.42; 95{\%} CI, 1.18-43.3; P =.03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Anal dysplasia is a silent disease that is frequently asymptomatic. However, patients with anal pain, anal lesions, and other high-risk factors are at increased risk of having high-grade anal dysplasia. These patients may benefit from routine screening with HRA.",
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T1 - Patient symptomatology in anal dysplasia

AU - Hicks, Caitlin

AU - Wick, Elizabeth C.

AU - Leeds, Ira L.

AU - Efron, Jonathan

AU - Gearhart, Susan L

AU - Safar, Bashar

AU - Fang, Sandy H

PY - 2015/6/1

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N2 - IMPORTANCE: High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) is becoming increasingly advocated as a method of screening for anal dysplasia in high-risk patients. OBJECTIVE: To describe, through HRA findings, the association between patient symptomatology and anal dysplasia among patients at high risk for anal dysplasia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Univariable and multivariable analyses were conducted of data from a prospectively maintained HRA database on all patients undergoing HRA with biopsy from November 1, 2011, to March 13, 2014, at a tertiary care HRA clinic. Data included demographics, medical history and comorbidities, HIV status and related measures (CD4 cell counts, HIV viral load, and use of highly active antiretroviral therapy), sexual orientation (when available), patient symptoms at initial presentation, physical examination findings, anal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear findings. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES High-resolution anoscopy diagnosis of high-vs low-grade dysplasia or no dysplasia. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one HRA biopsy specimens (mean [SEM], 1.77 [0.11] biopsy specimens per patient) were obtained from 91 patients (mean [SEM] age, 45.7 [1.2] years; 61 men [67%]; 47 black patients [52%]; and 70 human immunodeficiencyvirus-positive patients [77%]). Twenty-seven patients (30%) had high-grade dysplasia, 26 had low-grade dysplasia (29%), and 38 had no dysplasia (42%). The majority of patients (63 [69%]) were asymptomatic (anal pain, 11 [12%]; bleeding, 14 [15%]; and pruritus, 10 [11%]). Forty-one patients (45%) presented with anal pain (odds ratio, 5.25; 95% CI, 1.44-21.82; P =.02), and patients with either high- or low-grade dysplasia were more likely to present with anal lesions on physical examination compared with patients without dysplasia (odds ratio, 4.34; 95% CI, 1.78-11.20; P =.002). Multivariable analysis suggested that anal pain was independently associated with high-grade dysplasia (odds ratio, 6.42; 95% CI, 1.18-43.3; P =.03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Anal dysplasia is a silent disease that is frequently asymptomatic. However, patients with anal pain, anal lesions, and other high-risk factors are at increased risk of having high-grade anal dysplasia. These patients may benefit from routine screening with HRA.

AB - IMPORTANCE: High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) is becoming increasingly advocated as a method of screening for anal dysplasia in high-risk patients. OBJECTIVE: To describe, through HRA findings, the association between patient symptomatology and anal dysplasia among patients at high risk for anal dysplasia. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Univariable and multivariable analyses were conducted of data from a prospectively maintained HRA database on all patients undergoing HRA with biopsy from November 1, 2011, to March 13, 2014, at a tertiary care HRA clinic. Data included demographics, medical history and comorbidities, HIV status and related measures (CD4 cell counts, HIV viral load, and use of highly active antiretroviral therapy), sexual orientation (when available), patient symptoms at initial presentation, physical examination findings, anal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear findings. MAINOUTCOMESAND MEASURES High-resolution anoscopy diagnosis of high-vs low-grade dysplasia or no dysplasia. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one HRA biopsy specimens (mean [SEM], 1.77 [0.11] biopsy specimens per patient) were obtained from 91 patients (mean [SEM] age, 45.7 [1.2] years; 61 men [67%]; 47 black patients [52%]; and 70 human immunodeficiencyvirus-positive patients [77%]). Twenty-seven patients (30%) had high-grade dysplasia, 26 had low-grade dysplasia (29%), and 38 had no dysplasia (42%). The majority of patients (63 [69%]) were asymptomatic (anal pain, 11 [12%]; bleeding, 14 [15%]; and pruritus, 10 [11%]). Forty-one patients (45%) presented with anal pain (odds ratio, 5.25; 95% CI, 1.44-21.82; P =.02), and patients with either high- or low-grade dysplasia were more likely to present with anal lesions on physical examination compared with patients without dysplasia (odds ratio, 4.34; 95% CI, 1.78-11.20; P =.002). Multivariable analysis suggested that anal pain was independently associated with high-grade dysplasia (odds ratio, 6.42; 95% CI, 1.18-43.3; P =.03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Anal dysplasia is a silent disease that is frequently asymptomatic. However, patients with anal pain, anal lesions, and other high-risk factors are at increased risk of having high-grade anal dysplasia. These patients may benefit from routine screening with HRA.

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