Patient perceptions of readmission risk: An exploratory survey

Daniel Brotman, Hasan M. Shihab, Amanda Bertram, Alan Tieu, Henry G. Cheng, Erik Hans Hoyer, Nowella Durkin, Amy Deutschendorf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Interventions to prevent readmissions often rely upon patient participation to be successful. We surveyed 895 general medicine patients slated for hospital discharge to (1) assess patient attitudes surrounding readmission, (2) ascertain whether these attitudes were associated with actual readmission, and (3) determine whether patients can estimate their own readmission risk. Actual readmissions and other clinical variables were captured from administrative data and linked to individual survey responses. We found that actual readmissions were not correlated with patients’ interest in preventing readmission, sense of control over readmission, or intent to follow discharge instructions. However, patients were able to predict their own readmissions (P = .005) even after adjusting for predicted readmission rate, race, sex, age, and payer. Reassuringly, over 80% of respondents reported that they would be frustrated or disappointed to be readmitted and almost 90% indicated that they planned to follow all of their discharge instructions. Whether assessing patient-perceived readmission risk might help to target preventive interventions warrants further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-697
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Hospital Medicine
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Patient Readmission
Patient Participation
Medicine
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

Cite this

Patient perceptions of readmission risk : An exploratory survey. / Brotman, Daniel; Shihab, Hasan M.; Bertram, Amanda; Tieu, Alan; Cheng, Henry G.; Hoyer, Erik Hans; Durkin, Nowella; Deutschendorf, Amy.

In: Journal of Hospital Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 10, 01.10.2018, p. 695-697.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brotman, D, Shihab, HM, Bertram, A, Tieu, A, Cheng, HG, Hoyer, EH, Durkin, N & Deutschendorf, A 2018, 'Patient perceptions of readmission risk: An exploratory survey', Journal of Hospital Medicine, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 695-697. https://doi.org/10.12788/jhm.2958
Brotman, Daniel ; Shihab, Hasan M. ; Bertram, Amanda ; Tieu, Alan ; Cheng, Henry G. ; Hoyer, Erik Hans ; Durkin, Nowella ; Deutschendorf, Amy. / Patient perceptions of readmission risk : An exploratory survey. In: Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 695-697.
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