Patient outcomes comparing CRNA-administered peripheral nerve blocks and general anesthetics: A retrospective chart review in a US army same-day surgery center

Young J. Yauger, Jay A. Bryngelson, Kaori Donohue, Lori A. Lawhorn, Brian M. Pitcher, Bruce Schoneboom, Dorraine D. Watts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We compared outcomes between patients receiving general anesthesia (GA) vs regional block (RB) in a military same-day surgery unit (SDSU), where Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) delivered all RBs and GA. All patient charts from 2003 through 2006 were reviewed. Patients were included if they were 18 years or older, had an ASA physical status I or II, and underwent a shoulder or knee arthroscopy that used either RB or GA. Overall, 342 patients met inclusion criteria: 161 GA and 181 RB. With GA, mean anesthesia time was shorter (109.6 vs 135.5 minutes, P < .001), but recovery times were longer (56.7 vs 36.4 minutes, P < .001). SDSU times were nearly identical (GA vs RB, 71.5 vs 72.8 minutes), resulting in a total hospital time that was not significantly different (352.7 vs 347.5). The GA group received more morphine equivalents of narcotic in the operating room (22.9 vs 15.1 mg, P < .001) yet still had higher pain scores postoperatively than the RB group (1.1 vs 0.3, P < .001). The GA group received a significantly greater number of antiemetic doses intraoperatively (0.58 vs 0.04, P < .001) but still had a higher, although nonsignificant, rate of emesis (15.5% vs 10.0%). Patients receiving RB had less pain and received less analgesia without any increase in postoperative nausea and vomiting, hospital time, or anesthesia-related complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-220
Number of pages6
JournalAANA Journal
Volume78
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nurse Anesthetists
General Anesthetics
Nerve Block
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Peripheral Nerves
General Anesthesia
Nurses
Anesthesia
Pain
Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
Antiemetics
Conduction Anesthesia
Arthroscopy
Narcotics
Operating Rooms
Analgesia
Morphine
Vomiting
Knee

Keywords

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Pain
  • Regional blocks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Patient outcomes comparing CRNA-administered peripheral nerve blocks and general anesthetics : A retrospective chart review in a US army same-day surgery center. / Yauger, Young J.; Bryngelson, Jay A.; Donohue, Kaori; Lawhorn, Lori A.; Pitcher, Brian M.; Schoneboom, Bruce; Watts, Dorraine D.

In: AANA Journal, Vol. 78, No. 3, 01.06.2010, p. 215-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yauger, Young J. ; Bryngelson, Jay A. ; Donohue, Kaori ; Lawhorn, Lori A. ; Pitcher, Brian M. ; Schoneboom, Bruce ; Watts, Dorraine D. / Patient outcomes comparing CRNA-administered peripheral nerve blocks and general anesthetics : A retrospective chart review in a US army same-day surgery center. In: AANA Journal. 2010 ; Vol. 78, No. 3. pp. 215-220.
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