Patient-controlled analgesia after cesarean delivery Epidural sufentanil versus intravenous morphine

Jeffrey A. Grass, Rhonda L. Zuckerman, Neal Tokou Sakima, Andrew Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Objectives. The authors studied the efficacy of sufentanil patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for postoperative analgesia after cesarean delivery and compared these results to a morphine intravenous-patient-controlled-analgesia (IV-PCA) regimen. Methods. Fifty patients were randomized into two groups to receive sufentanil PCEA or morphine IV-PCA after cesarean delivery under epidural anesthesia. Visual-analog-scale pain scores (0-100 mm: 0 mm = no pain, 100 mm = worst pain), sedation, side effects, recovery times, and patient satisfaction were assessed through 4 p.m. on postoperative day (POD) 2. Results. Analgesia was similar in the two groups, except following the initial physician-administered loading dose when pain was rated significantly lower by patients in the PCEA group at 30 minutes (6 ± 2 mm versus 38 ± 6 mm; P <.01) and at 2 hours (7 ± 2 mm versus 27 ± 5 mm; P <.05). Sedation was rated lower by patients in the PCEA group at 2 hours (P <.05). The incidence of nausea and vomiting was similar in both groups. The incidence of pruritus requiring treatment was greater in the PCEA group (57% versus 12%; P <.01). Length of hospitalization was not different. Patients were equally satisfied in both groups. Conclusions. Although sufentanil PCEA provided satisfactory sustained postoperative analgesia, sufentanil PCEA appears to offer no clear advantage over morphine IV-PCA beyond the effects of the initial physician-administered loading dose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-97
Number of pages8
JournalRegional Anesthesia
Volume19
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1994

Fingerprint

Sufentanil
Patient-Controlled Analgesia
Morphine
Epidural Analgesia
Analgesia
Pain
Physicians
Epidural Anesthesia
Incidence
Pain Measurement
Pruritus
Patient Satisfaction
Nausea
Vomiting
Hospitalization

Keywords

  • analgesics
  • anesthetic techniques
  • epidural
  • morphine
  • obstetric
  • patient-controlled analgesia
  • patient-controlled epidural analgesia
  • spinal opioids
  • sufentanil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Patient-controlled analgesia after cesarean delivery Epidural sufentanil versus intravenous morphine. / Grass, Jeffrey A.; Zuckerman, Rhonda L.; Sakima, Neal Tokou; Harris, Andrew.

In: Regional Anesthesia, Vol. 19, No. 2, 03.1994, p. 90-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grass, Jeffrey A. ; Zuckerman, Rhonda L. ; Sakima, Neal Tokou ; Harris, Andrew. / Patient-controlled analgesia after cesarean delivery Epidural sufentanil versus intravenous morphine. In: Regional Anesthesia. 1994 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 90-97.
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