Pathologic models to predict outcome for women with endometrial adenocarcinoma: The importance of the distinction between surgical stage and clinical stage - A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

Richard J. Zaino, Robert J. Kurman, Karen L. Diana, C. Paul Morrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Numerous pathologic factors have been identified as important in predicting outcome for women with endometrial adenocarcinoma. However, most patients have a mixture of good and bad factors. For these women, the prognosis is uncertain, and it is often unclear whether postoperative therapy is indicated. METHODS. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the pathologic factors commonly reported to be of prognostic significance, using data from 819 patients with clinical Stages I and II endometrial adenocarcinoma from a Gynecologic Oncology Group study. Since the clinical stage frequently underestimated the surgical stage, models that designate the relative risk associated with each of the variables were created for both clinical and surgical Stage I and II patients. RESULTS. We confirmed the importance of age, depth of myometrial invasion, and to a lesser degree, histologic grade, and cell type, as independent prognostic variables. CONCLUSIONS. The relative risk of death can be determined using a simple multiplicative calculation, and the absolute risk can be estimated by inspection of the accompanying figures. These data can be used to provide patients with prognostic information and to help determine the need for postoperative adjuvant therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1115-1121
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume77
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 1996

Keywords

  • adenocarcinoma
  • endometrium
  • female genitalia
  • neoplasms
  • pathology
  • risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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