Pathogenesis and the role of ARID1A mutation in endometriosis-related ovarian neoplasms

Daichi Maeda, Ie Ming Shih

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Endometriosis-related ovarian neoplasms (ERONs) are a unique group of tumors as they are associated with endometriosis, especially endometriosis presenting as an ovarian endometriotic cyst (endometrioma). ERONs include clear cell carcinoma, endometrioid carcinoma, and seromucinous borderline tumor. A growing body of evidence from both clinicopathologic and molecular studies suggests that most, if not all, ERONs develop from endometriotic cyst epithelium through different stages of tumor progression. The endometriotic cyst contains abundant iron-induced reactive oxygen species that are thought to be mutagenic, and chronic exposure of cystic epithelium to this microenvironment facilitates the accumulation of somatic mutations that ultimately result in tumor development. Molecular analyses of ERONs, including genome-wide screens, have identified several molecular genetic alterations that lead to aberrant activation or inactivation of pathways involving ARID1A, PI3K, Wnt, and PP2A. Among all molecular genetic changes identified to date, inactivating mutations of the ARID1A tumor suppressor gene are the most common in ERON. Understanding the molecular changes and pathogenesis involved in the development of ERON is fundamental for future translational studies aimed at designing new diagnostic tests for early detection and identifying critical molecular features for targeted therapeutics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-52
Number of pages8
JournalAdvances in Anatomic Pathology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Endometriosis
Ovarian Neoplasms
Mutation
Cysts
Molecular Biology
Neoplasms
Epithelium
Endometrioid Carcinoma
Ovarian Cysts
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Reactive Oxygen Species
Iron
Genome
Carcinoma

Keywords

  • ARID1A
  • clear cell carcinoma
  • endometrial carcinoma
  • endometrioid carcinoma
  • endometriosis-related ovarian neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Anatomy

Cite this

Pathogenesis and the role of ARID1A mutation in endometriosis-related ovarian neoplasms. / Maeda, Daichi; Shih, Ie Ming.

In: Advances in Anatomic Pathology, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 45-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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