Parturition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

Jane Teas, Henry G. Taylor, Thomas L. Richie, Rakesh Das Shrestha, George K. Turner, Charles H. Southwick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During five years of birth season fieldwork, we observed two births and three peri-birth instances of behavior of free-ranging rhesus living in Kathmandu, Nepal. These constitute the first two recorded free-ranging rhesus births, and we compare them to the behavior which has been observed in captivity and expected in the wild. The free-ranging parturition behavior was characterized by a general lack of contact with other troop members and by overall inconspicuousness. In the first birth we observed, the troop moved about 70 m up the hill, leaving the laboring female behind on an open hillside. Two males, a female and a juvenile returned and rested about 20 m from the delivering female. During the second delivery, the female stayed with the troop and seemed to participate normally in most troop interactions, although she avoided physical contact with other troop members. We propose that this near-normal behavior may help to assure successful parturition by allowing the female the needed social isolation and inconspicuousness without any loss of troop protection. It may also partly explain why births have not been observed during previous studies. Observations of rhesus parturition behavior reported from studies of captive monkeys and reports from other free-ranging primate studies are compared with our data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)580-586
Number of pages7
JournalPrimates
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1981

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Macaca mulatta
parturition
Nepal
monkeys
Primates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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Teas, J., Taylor, H. G., Richie, T. L., Shrestha, R. D., Turner, G. K., & Southwick, C. H. (1981). Parturition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Primates, 22(4), 580-586. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02381251

Parturition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). / Teas, Jane; Taylor, Henry G.; Richie, Thomas L.; Shrestha, Rakesh Das; Turner, George K.; Southwick, Charles H.

In: Primates, Vol. 22, No. 4, 10.1981, p. 580-586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Teas, J, Taylor, HG, Richie, TL, Shrestha, RD, Turner, GK & Southwick, CH 1981, 'Parturition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)', Primates, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 580-586. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02381251
Teas J, Taylor HG, Richie TL, Shrestha RD, Turner GK, Southwick CH. Parturition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Primates. 1981 Oct;22(4):580-586. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02381251
Teas, Jane ; Taylor, Henry G. ; Richie, Thomas L. ; Shrestha, Rakesh Das ; Turner, George K. ; Southwick, Charles H. / Parturition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). In: Primates. 1981 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 580-586.
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