Partnering with education and job and training programs for sustainable tobacco control among Baltimore african american young adults.

Katherine Clegg Smith, Lee Bone, Eric A. Clay, Kerry Owings, Sean Thames, Frances Stillman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Young adults are generally overlooked in tobacco control initiatives, even though they are critical to sustained success. African American young adults who are not in higher education or working are particularly vulnerable to harmful tobacco use, given high smoking rates and limited access to cessation services. Guided by community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, we sought to identify program and community-level strategies to reduce tobacco use among African American young adults in Baltimore. We describe the challenges and opportunities for integrating effective tobacco control into community-based education and job training programs for unemployed young adults. As part of a longstanding community-research partnership in Baltimore, we conducted fourteen semistructured key informant interviews with leaders from city government and education and job training programs for young adults. The research design, data collection, analysis, and dissemination all included dialogue between and active contribution by both research and community partners. Interview data were structured into opportunities (mindset for change and desire for bonds with a trusted adult), challenges (culture of fatalism, tobacco as a stress reliever, and culture of tobacco use among young adults), and possible tobacco control solutions (tobacco education designed with and for program staff and participants and integration of tobacco issues into holistic program goals and policies). The emergent themes enhance our understanding of how tobacco is situated in the lives of unemployed young adults and the potential for building sustainable, community-based public health solutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-17
Number of pages9
JournalProgress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Baltimore
African Americans
nicotine
Tobacco
young adult
training program
Young Adult
Education
Tobacco Use
education
community
Community-Based Participatory Research
Interviews
Local Government
American
Research
fatalism
community research
Research Design
Public Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{7e1ac1c557294431b49a14906c09f187,
title = "Partnering with education and job and training programs for sustainable tobacco control among Baltimore african american young adults.",
abstract = "Young adults are generally overlooked in tobacco control initiatives, even though they are critical to sustained success. African American young adults who are not in higher education or working are particularly vulnerable to harmful tobacco use, given high smoking rates and limited access to cessation services. Guided by community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, we sought to identify program and community-level strategies to reduce tobacco use among African American young adults in Baltimore. We describe the challenges and opportunities for integrating effective tobacco control into community-based education and job training programs for unemployed young adults. As part of a longstanding community-research partnership in Baltimore, we conducted fourteen semistructured key informant interviews with leaders from city government and education and job training programs for young adults. The research design, data collection, analysis, and dissemination all included dialogue between and active contribution by both research and community partners. Interview data were structured into opportunities (mindset for change and desire for bonds with a trusted adult), challenges (culture of fatalism, tobacco as a stress reliever, and culture of tobacco use among young adults), and possible tobacco control solutions (tobacco education designed with and for program staff and participants and integration of tobacco issues into holistic program goals and policies). The emergent themes enhance our understanding of how tobacco is situated in the lives of unemployed young adults and the potential for building sustainable, community-based public health solutions.",
author = "Smith, {Katherine Clegg} and Lee Bone and Clay, {Eric A.} and Kerry Owings and Sean Thames and Frances Stillman",
year = "2009",
month = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "9--17",
journal = "Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action",
issn = "1557-0541",
publisher = "Johns Hopkins University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Partnering with education and job and training programs for sustainable tobacco control among Baltimore african american young adults.

AU - Smith, Katherine Clegg

AU - Bone, Lee

AU - Clay, Eric A.

AU - Owings, Kerry

AU - Thames, Sean

AU - Stillman, Frances

PY - 2009/3

Y1 - 2009/3

N2 - Young adults are generally overlooked in tobacco control initiatives, even though they are critical to sustained success. African American young adults who are not in higher education or working are particularly vulnerable to harmful tobacco use, given high smoking rates and limited access to cessation services. Guided by community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, we sought to identify program and community-level strategies to reduce tobacco use among African American young adults in Baltimore. We describe the challenges and opportunities for integrating effective tobacco control into community-based education and job training programs for unemployed young adults. As part of a longstanding community-research partnership in Baltimore, we conducted fourteen semistructured key informant interviews with leaders from city government and education and job training programs for young adults. The research design, data collection, analysis, and dissemination all included dialogue between and active contribution by both research and community partners. Interview data were structured into opportunities (mindset for change and desire for bonds with a trusted adult), challenges (culture of fatalism, tobacco as a stress reliever, and culture of tobacco use among young adults), and possible tobacco control solutions (tobacco education designed with and for program staff and participants and integration of tobacco issues into holistic program goals and policies). The emergent themes enhance our understanding of how tobacco is situated in the lives of unemployed young adults and the potential for building sustainable, community-based public health solutions.

AB - Young adults are generally overlooked in tobacco control initiatives, even though they are critical to sustained success. African American young adults who are not in higher education or working are particularly vulnerable to harmful tobacco use, given high smoking rates and limited access to cessation services. Guided by community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, we sought to identify program and community-level strategies to reduce tobacco use among African American young adults in Baltimore. We describe the challenges and opportunities for integrating effective tobacco control into community-based education and job training programs for unemployed young adults. As part of a longstanding community-research partnership in Baltimore, we conducted fourteen semistructured key informant interviews with leaders from city government and education and job training programs for young adults. The research design, data collection, analysis, and dissemination all included dialogue between and active contribution by both research and community partners. Interview data were structured into opportunities (mindset for change and desire for bonds with a trusted adult), challenges (culture of fatalism, tobacco as a stress reliever, and culture of tobacco use among young adults), and possible tobacco control solutions (tobacco education designed with and for program staff and participants and integration of tobacco issues into holistic program goals and policies). The emergent themes enhance our understanding of how tobacco is situated in the lives of unemployed young adults and the potential for building sustainable, community-based public health solutions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952108809&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952108809&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 20208297

AN - SCOPUS:79952108809

VL - 3

SP - 9

EP - 17

JO - Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action

JF - Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action

SN - 1557-0541

IS - 1

ER -