Partial rescue of growth failure in Growth Hormone (GH)-deficient mice by a single injection of a double-stranded adeno-associated viral vector expressing the GH gene driven by a muscle-specific regulatory cassette

Marco Martari, Alessia Sagazio, Ali Mohamadi, Quynh Nguyen, Stephen D. Hauschka, Eun Kim, Roberto Salvatori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) causes somatic growth impairment. GH has a short half-life and therefore it must be administered by daily subcutaneous injections. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been used to deliver genes to animals, and double-stranded AAV (dsAAV) vectors provide widespread and stable transgene expression. In the present study we tested whether an intramuscular injection of dsAAV vector expressing GH under the control of a muscle creatine kinase regulatory cassette would ensure sufficient systemic GH delivery in conjunction with muscle-specific expression. Virus-injected GHD mice showed a significant (p<0.05) increase in body length and body weight, without reaching full normalization, and significant (p<0.05) reduction in absolute and relative visceral fat. Quantitative RT-PCR showed preferential GH expression in skeletal muscles that was confirmed by qualitative fluorescence analysis in mice injected with a similar virus expressing green fluorescent protein. The present study shows that systemic GH delivery to GHD animals is possible via a single intramuscular injection of dsAAV carrying a muscle-specific GH-expressing regulatory cassette.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)759-766
Number of pages8
JournalHuman gene therapy
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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