Parenting in females exposed to intimate partner violence and childhood sexual abuse

Anna E. Jaffe, Christopher C. Cranston, Joanna O. Shadlow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence may have a significant impact on parenting. The current study expands on existing research by examining the effects of child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence on parenting styles and parenting self-efficacy. In women from a parenting intervention program (n = 20), child sexual abuse was related to lower parenting self-efficacy and more permissive parenting. In women at a domestic violence shelter (n = 45), child sexual abuse was related to current sexual coercion of the partner, and authoritative parenting was related to higher parenting self-efficacy. These results indicate that having a history of child sexual abuse should be taken into consideration when dealing with mothers in violent relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)684-700
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Child Sexual Abuse
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adverse childhood experiences
  • Child-rearing practices
  • Domestic abuse
  • Mothering
  • Physical abuse
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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