Parental smoking behavior and passive smoke exposure in children with asthma

Marilyn L. Winkelstein, Anita Tarzian, Robert A Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Smoking parents of children with asthma frequently report modifying their smoking behavior to reduce their child's smoke exposure. Research has not analyzed the association between parental efforts and the child's smoke exposure. Objective: To determine passive smoke exposure and the relationship of self-reported parental modifications in smoking behavior to smoke exposure in children with asthma. Methods: Parents of children seen in an inner-city Asthma and AlLergy Outpatient Clinic completed questionnaires to evaluate their smoking behavior and modifications they made to decrease their child's exposure to cigarette smoke. Urine specimens were collected from the children to determine smoke exposure as measured by urinary cotinine/creatinine ratios. Results: Children from homes with smokers had higher mean urinary cotinine/creatine ratios than children from smoke free homes (30 versus 4 ng/mg; P .0005). Cotinine/creatinine ratios increased with the number of smokers in the home. When the parent was the only smoker in the home, the mean urinary cotinine/creatine ratio of children whose parent smoked outside the house was lower than the mean of children whose parent smoked inside (21 versus 51 ng/mg; P = .038). With only one smoker in the home, there was no difference in mean cotinine/creatinine ratios when the primary caregiver was the smoker versus when the primary caregiver was not the smoker (27 versus 15 ng/mg; P = .10). Conclusion: Smoking outside the house was associated with lower urinary cotinine/creatinine ratio only when the parent was the only smoker in the home.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-423
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume78
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1997

Fingerprint

Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Smoke
Asthma
Cotinine
Smoking
Creatinine
Creatine
Caregivers
Parents
Behavior Therapy
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Tobacco Products
Hypersensitivity
Urine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Parental smoking behavior and passive smoke exposure in children with asthma. / Winkelstein, Marilyn L.; Tarzian, Anita; Wood, Robert A.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 78, No. 4, 04.1997, p. 419-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{09e10a53b92240cd8821f021e734e434,
title = "Parental smoking behavior and passive smoke exposure in children with asthma",
abstract = "Background: Smoking parents of children with asthma frequently report modifying their smoking behavior to reduce their child's smoke exposure. Research has not analyzed the association between parental efforts and the child's smoke exposure. Objective: To determine passive smoke exposure and the relationship of self-reported parental modifications in smoking behavior to smoke exposure in children with asthma. Methods: Parents of children seen in an inner-city Asthma and AlLergy Outpatient Clinic completed questionnaires to evaluate their smoking behavior and modifications they made to decrease their child's exposure to cigarette smoke. Urine specimens were collected from the children to determine smoke exposure as measured by urinary cotinine/creatinine ratios. Results: Children from homes with smokers had higher mean urinary cotinine/creatine ratios than children from smoke free homes (30 versus 4 ng/mg; P .0005). Cotinine/creatinine ratios increased with the number of smokers in the home. When the parent was the only smoker in the home, the mean urinary cotinine/creatine ratio of children whose parent smoked outside the house was lower than the mean of children whose parent smoked inside (21 versus 51 ng/mg; P = .038). With only one smoker in the home, there was no difference in mean cotinine/creatinine ratios when the primary caregiver was the smoker versus when the primary caregiver was not the smoker (27 versus 15 ng/mg; P = .10). Conclusion: Smoking outside the house was associated with lower urinary cotinine/creatinine ratio only when the parent was the only smoker in the home.",
author = "Winkelstein, {Marilyn L.} and Anita Tarzian and Wood, {Robert A}",
year = "1997",
month = "4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "78",
pages = "419--423",
journal = "Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology",
issn = "1081-1206",
publisher = "American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parental smoking behavior and passive smoke exposure in children with asthma

AU - Winkelstein, Marilyn L.

AU - Tarzian, Anita

AU - Wood, Robert A

PY - 1997/4

Y1 - 1997/4

N2 - Background: Smoking parents of children with asthma frequently report modifying their smoking behavior to reduce their child's smoke exposure. Research has not analyzed the association between parental efforts and the child's smoke exposure. Objective: To determine passive smoke exposure and the relationship of self-reported parental modifications in smoking behavior to smoke exposure in children with asthma. Methods: Parents of children seen in an inner-city Asthma and AlLergy Outpatient Clinic completed questionnaires to evaluate their smoking behavior and modifications they made to decrease their child's exposure to cigarette smoke. Urine specimens were collected from the children to determine smoke exposure as measured by urinary cotinine/creatinine ratios. Results: Children from homes with smokers had higher mean urinary cotinine/creatine ratios than children from smoke free homes (30 versus 4 ng/mg; P .0005). Cotinine/creatinine ratios increased with the number of smokers in the home. When the parent was the only smoker in the home, the mean urinary cotinine/creatine ratio of children whose parent smoked outside the house was lower than the mean of children whose parent smoked inside (21 versus 51 ng/mg; P = .038). With only one smoker in the home, there was no difference in mean cotinine/creatinine ratios when the primary caregiver was the smoker versus when the primary caregiver was not the smoker (27 versus 15 ng/mg; P = .10). Conclusion: Smoking outside the house was associated with lower urinary cotinine/creatinine ratio only when the parent was the only smoker in the home.

AB - Background: Smoking parents of children with asthma frequently report modifying their smoking behavior to reduce their child's smoke exposure. Research has not analyzed the association between parental efforts and the child's smoke exposure. Objective: To determine passive smoke exposure and the relationship of self-reported parental modifications in smoking behavior to smoke exposure in children with asthma. Methods: Parents of children seen in an inner-city Asthma and AlLergy Outpatient Clinic completed questionnaires to evaluate their smoking behavior and modifications they made to decrease their child's exposure to cigarette smoke. Urine specimens were collected from the children to determine smoke exposure as measured by urinary cotinine/creatinine ratios. Results: Children from homes with smokers had higher mean urinary cotinine/creatine ratios than children from smoke free homes (30 versus 4 ng/mg; P .0005). Cotinine/creatinine ratios increased with the number of smokers in the home. When the parent was the only smoker in the home, the mean urinary cotinine/creatine ratio of children whose parent smoked outside the house was lower than the mean of children whose parent smoked inside (21 versus 51 ng/mg; P = .038). With only one smoker in the home, there was no difference in mean cotinine/creatinine ratios when the primary caregiver was the smoker versus when the primary caregiver was not the smoker (27 versus 15 ng/mg; P = .10). Conclusion: Smoking outside the house was associated with lower urinary cotinine/creatinine ratio only when the parent was the only smoker in the home.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030953467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030953467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9109712

AN - SCOPUS:0030953467

VL - 78

SP - 419

EP - 423

JO - Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

JF - Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

SN - 1081-1206

IS - 4

ER -