Parental perceptions and satisfaction with stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

Susan dosReis, Julie Magno Zito, Daniel J. Safer, Karen L. Soeken, John W. Mitchell, Leslie C. Ellwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Few reports have documented parental perceptions of stimulants for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), despite the recent increased use of stimulants among youths. Of 302 parents recruited from six pediatric primary care clinics, 84% completed a survey of their knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction with the medication their child was taking for ADHD. Two thirds of the parents believed that sugar and diet affect hyperactivity. Although few parents believed that stimulants could lead to drug abuse, 55% initially were hesitant to use medication on the basis of information in the lay press, and 38% believed that too many children receive medication for ADHD. Parents were more satisfied with the behavioral and academic improvement relative to improvement in their child's self-esteem. Attitudes were positively correlated with satisfaction and were more positive among white than nonwhite parents. The findings highlight parental misconceptions and reservations about ADHD medication treatment that require clarification as to whether race/ethnicity, income, and social status influence their views and use of treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-162
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume24
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2003

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Parents
Self Concept
Substance-Related Disorders
Primary Health Care
Pediatrics
Diet
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit
  • Attitudes
  • Hyperactivity disorder
  • Satisfaction
  • Stimulant medications
  • Survey research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Parental perceptions and satisfaction with stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. / dosReis, Susan; Zito, Julie Magno; Safer, Daniel J.; Soeken, Karen L.; Mitchell, John W.; Ellwood, Leslie C.

In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Vol. 24, No. 3, 06.2003, p. 155-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

dosReis, Susan ; Zito, Julie Magno ; Safer, Daniel J. ; Soeken, Karen L. ; Mitchell, John W. ; Ellwood, Leslie C. / Parental perceptions and satisfaction with stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. 2003 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 155-162.
@article{ab2e88b7ef534bb5bf88c5fce5cebac2,
title = "Parental perceptions and satisfaction with stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder",
abstract = "Few reports have documented parental perceptions of stimulants for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), despite the recent increased use of stimulants among youths. Of 302 parents recruited from six pediatric primary care clinics, 84{\%} completed a survey of their knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction with the medication their child was taking for ADHD. Two thirds of the parents believed that sugar and diet affect hyperactivity. Although few parents believed that stimulants could lead to drug abuse, 55{\%} initially were hesitant to use medication on the basis of information in the lay press, and 38{\%} believed that too many children receive medication for ADHD. Parents were more satisfied with the behavioral and academic improvement relative to improvement in their child's self-esteem. Attitudes were positively correlated with satisfaction and were more positive among white than nonwhite parents. The findings highlight parental misconceptions and reservations about ADHD medication treatment that require clarification as to whether race/ethnicity, income, and social status influence their views and use of treatments.",
keywords = "Attention-deficit, Attitudes, Hyperactivity disorder, Satisfaction, Stimulant medications, Survey research",
author = "Susan dosReis and Zito, {Julie Magno} and Safer, {Daniel J.} and Soeken, {Karen L.} and Mitchell, {John W.} and Ellwood, {Leslie C.}",
year = "2003",
month = "6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "155--162",
journal = "Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics",
issn = "0196-206X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parental perceptions and satisfaction with stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

AU - dosReis, Susan

AU - Zito, Julie Magno

AU - Safer, Daniel J.

AU - Soeken, Karen L.

AU - Mitchell, John W.

AU - Ellwood, Leslie C.

PY - 2003/6

Y1 - 2003/6

N2 - Few reports have documented parental perceptions of stimulants for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), despite the recent increased use of stimulants among youths. Of 302 parents recruited from six pediatric primary care clinics, 84% completed a survey of their knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction with the medication their child was taking for ADHD. Two thirds of the parents believed that sugar and diet affect hyperactivity. Although few parents believed that stimulants could lead to drug abuse, 55% initially were hesitant to use medication on the basis of information in the lay press, and 38% believed that too many children receive medication for ADHD. Parents were more satisfied with the behavioral and academic improvement relative to improvement in their child's self-esteem. Attitudes were positively correlated with satisfaction and were more positive among white than nonwhite parents. The findings highlight parental misconceptions and reservations about ADHD medication treatment that require clarification as to whether race/ethnicity, income, and social status influence their views and use of treatments.

AB - Few reports have documented parental perceptions of stimulants for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), despite the recent increased use of stimulants among youths. Of 302 parents recruited from six pediatric primary care clinics, 84% completed a survey of their knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction with the medication their child was taking for ADHD. Two thirds of the parents believed that sugar and diet affect hyperactivity. Although few parents believed that stimulants could lead to drug abuse, 55% initially were hesitant to use medication on the basis of information in the lay press, and 38% believed that too many children receive medication for ADHD. Parents were more satisfied with the behavioral and academic improvement relative to improvement in their child's self-esteem. Attitudes were positively correlated with satisfaction and were more positive among white than nonwhite parents. The findings highlight parental misconceptions and reservations about ADHD medication treatment that require clarification as to whether race/ethnicity, income, and social status influence their views and use of treatments.

KW - Attention-deficit

KW - Attitudes

KW - Hyperactivity disorder

KW - Satisfaction

KW - Stimulant medications

KW - Survey research

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0043092428&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0043092428&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12806227

AN - SCOPUS:0043092428

VL - 24

SP - 155

EP - 162

JO - Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

SN - 0196-206X

IS - 3

ER -