Parental mental and pain-related health and pediatric ambulatory care sensitive emergency department visits and hospitalizations

Joseph E. Logan, Anne W Riley, Lawrence E. Barker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To investigate the types of parental psychiatric and pain-related (PR) conditions that are associated with inadequate management of children's health and medical needs. Data Sources. The 1997-1998 Thomson/Medstat MarketScan® claims and administrative dataset. Study Design. A cross-sectional study that assessed the associations between parents' claims for psychiatric and PR conditions, and their children's well-child care as well as emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for conditions that can be treated effectively in outpatient settings (ambulatory care sensitive [ACS] conditions). Data Extraction Methods. Claims were extracted for 258,313 children of ages 0-17 years and their parents, who had insurance coverage for a full 2-year period. Principle Findings. Multiple parental psychiatric and PR diagnoses were associated with child ACS emergency services/hospitalizations. Maternal depression was negatively associated with a child having the recommended well-child visits (odds ratio [OR]: 0.92, 95 percent confidence intervals [CI]: 0.84-0.99). The combined diagnoses of maternal depression and back pain was positively associated with a child having an ACS-ED visit (OR: 1.64, 95 percent CI: 1.33-2.03) and a child having an ACS hospitalization (OR: 2.04, 95 percent CI: 1.34-3.09). Conclusions. Pediatricians' ability to manage child health may be enhanced with coordinated management of parental psychopathology and PR health conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)656-674
Number of pages19
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Ambulatory Care
hospitalization
Hospital Emergency Service
pain
Hospitalization
Pediatrics
Pain
Health
health
Psychiatry
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Child Care
confidence
Parents
Mothers
child care
Depression
parents
Aptitude

Keywords

  • Ambulatory care sensitive conditions
  • Maternal child health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Parental mental and pain-related health and pediatric ambulatory care sensitive emergency department visits and hospitalizations. / Logan, Joseph E.; Riley, Anne W; Barker, Lawrence E.

In: Health Services Research, Vol. 43, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 656-674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e146b99ad7a2463195e3fe512717c6b9,
title = "Parental mental and pain-related health and pediatric ambulatory care sensitive emergency department visits and hospitalizations",
abstract = "Objective. To investigate the types of parental psychiatric and pain-related (PR) conditions that are associated with inadequate management of children's health and medical needs. Data Sources. The 1997-1998 Thomson/Medstat MarketScan{\circledR} claims and administrative dataset. Study Design. A cross-sectional study that assessed the associations between parents' claims for psychiatric and PR conditions, and their children's well-child care as well as emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for conditions that can be treated effectively in outpatient settings (ambulatory care sensitive [ACS] conditions). Data Extraction Methods. Claims were extracted for 258,313 children of ages 0-17 years and their parents, who had insurance coverage for a full 2-year period. Principle Findings. Multiple parental psychiatric and PR diagnoses were associated with child ACS emergency services/hospitalizations. Maternal depression was negatively associated with a child having the recommended well-child visits (odds ratio [OR]: 0.92, 95 percent confidence intervals [CI]: 0.84-0.99). The combined diagnoses of maternal depression and back pain was positively associated with a child having an ACS-ED visit (OR: 1.64, 95 percent CI: 1.33-2.03) and a child having an ACS hospitalization (OR: 2.04, 95 percent CI: 1.34-3.09). Conclusions. Pediatricians' ability to manage child health may be enhanced with coordinated management of parental psychopathology and PR health conditions.",
keywords = "Ambulatory care sensitive conditions, Maternal child health",
author = "Logan, {Joseph E.} and Riley, {Anne W} and Barker, {Lawrence E.}",
year = "2008",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1111/j.1475-6773.2007.00790.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "656--674",
journal = "Health Services Research",
issn = "0017-9124",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parental mental and pain-related health and pediatric ambulatory care sensitive emergency department visits and hospitalizations

AU - Logan, Joseph E.

AU - Riley, Anne W

AU - Barker, Lawrence E.

PY - 2008/4

Y1 - 2008/4

N2 - Objective. To investigate the types of parental psychiatric and pain-related (PR) conditions that are associated with inadequate management of children's health and medical needs. Data Sources. The 1997-1998 Thomson/Medstat MarketScan® claims and administrative dataset. Study Design. A cross-sectional study that assessed the associations between parents' claims for psychiatric and PR conditions, and their children's well-child care as well as emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for conditions that can be treated effectively in outpatient settings (ambulatory care sensitive [ACS] conditions). Data Extraction Methods. Claims were extracted for 258,313 children of ages 0-17 years and their parents, who had insurance coverage for a full 2-year period. Principle Findings. Multiple parental psychiatric and PR diagnoses were associated with child ACS emergency services/hospitalizations. Maternal depression was negatively associated with a child having the recommended well-child visits (odds ratio [OR]: 0.92, 95 percent confidence intervals [CI]: 0.84-0.99). The combined diagnoses of maternal depression and back pain was positively associated with a child having an ACS-ED visit (OR: 1.64, 95 percent CI: 1.33-2.03) and a child having an ACS hospitalization (OR: 2.04, 95 percent CI: 1.34-3.09). Conclusions. Pediatricians' ability to manage child health may be enhanced with coordinated management of parental psychopathology and PR health conditions.

AB - Objective. To investigate the types of parental psychiatric and pain-related (PR) conditions that are associated with inadequate management of children's health and medical needs. Data Sources. The 1997-1998 Thomson/Medstat MarketScan® claims and administrative dataset. Study Design. A cross-sectional study that assessed the associations between parents' claims for psychiatric and PR conditions, and their children's well-child care as well as emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for conditions that can be treated effectively in outpatient settings (ambulatory care sensitive [ACS] conditions). Data Extraction Methods. Claims were extracted for 258,313 children of ages 0-17 years and their parents, who had insurance coverage for a full 2-year period. Principle Findings. Multiple parental psychiatric and PR diagnoses were associated with child ACS emergency services/hospitalizations. Maternal depression was negatively associated with a child having the recommended well-child visits (odds ratio [OR]: 0.92, 95 percent confidence intervals [CI]: 0.84-0.99). The combined diagnoses of maternal depression and back pain was positively associated with a child having an ACS-ED visit (OR: 1.64, 95 percent CI: 1.33-2.03) and a child having an ACS hospitalization (OR: 2.04, 95 percent CI: 1.34-3.09). Conclusions. Pediatricians' ability to manage child health may be enhanced with coordinated management of parental psychopathology and PR health conditions.

KW - Ambulatory care sensitive conditions

KW - Maternal child health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=41149117402&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=41149117402&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1475-6773.2007.00790.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1475-6773.2007.00790.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 18370972

AN - SCOPUS:41149117402

VL - 43

SP - 656

EP - 674

JO - Health Services Research

JF - Health Services Research

SN - 0017-9124

IS - 2

ER -