Parent training: Acquisition and generalization of discrete trials teaching skills with parents of children with autism

Jennifer L. Crockett, Richard K. Fleming, Karla J. Doepke, Jenny S. Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the effects of an intensive parent training program on the acquisition and generalization of discrete trial teaching (DTT) procedures with two parents of children with autism. Over the course of the program, parents applied the DTT procedures to teach four different functional skills to their children, which allowed for an assessment of "free" and programmed generalization across stimulus exemplars. Parent training was conducted by the first author utilizing instructions, demonstrations, role-play, and practice with feedback. Parents' use of DTT skills and children's correct and incorrect responding were measured. A within-subject multiple-baseline across stimulus exemplars (functional skills taught) design was employed both to demonstrate control of the training program over parents' correct use of DTT, and to allow a preliminary investigation of the generalized effects of training to multiple stimulus exemplars. Results demonstrate initial control of the training program over parent responding, and the extent to which each parent extended her use of DTT procedures across untrained and topographically different child skills. The potential for designing more generalizable and thus more cost-effective parent training programs is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-36
Number of pages14
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Discrete trials teaching
  • Parent training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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