Paratransgenesis Applications: Fighting Malaria With Engineered Mosquito Symbiotic Bacteria

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Mosquitoes are vectors of many diseases, including malaria, lymphatic filariasis, yellow fever, dengue, and Zika. In each case, the pathogen is transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected female mosquito. Therefore, eliminating the mosquitoes or interfering with their ability to support pathogen development will block transmission. Conventional tools to control vector mosquitoes with chemical pesticides are often associated with environmental toxicity, adverse effects on human health, and importantly, emergence of insect resistance. Here we consider an alternative strategy, termed paratransgenesis, for controlling transmission of malaria via genetic engineering of mosquito symbionts to deliver antipathogen effector molecules. Rather than eliminating the mosquito, paratransgenesis aims to convert it into an ineffective disease vector. This approach is low-tech and effective concomitantly for multiple mosquito and parasite species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationVector Microbiome and Innate Immunity of Arthropods
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages219-234
Number of pages16
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9780128092378
ISBN (Print)9780128053508
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 27 2017

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Culicidae
malaria
Malaria
Bacteria
bacteria
Human Bites
Filarial Elephantiasis
Mosquito Control
Yellow Fever
Disease Vectors
Genetic Engineering
Dengue
Yellow fever virus
Pesticides
filariasis
Insects
disease vectors
ecotoxicology
dengue
vector control

Keywords

  • Effector molecules
  • Gut microbiota
  • Mosquito-borne diseases
  • Paratransgenesis
  • Transmission blocking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Wang, S., & Jacobs-Lorena, M. (2017). Paratransgenesis Applications: Fighting Malaria With Engineered Mosquito Symbiotic Bacteria. In Vector Microbiome and Innate Immunity of Arthropods (Vol. 1, pp. 219-234). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-805350-8.00013-1

Paratransgenesis Applications : Fighting Malaria With Engineered Mosquito Symbiotic Bacteria. / Wang, Sibao; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo.

Vector Microbiome and Innate Immunity of Arthropods. Vol. 1 Elsevier Inc., 2017. p. 219-234.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wang, S & Jacobs-Lorena, M 2017, Paratransgenesis Applications: Fighting Malaria With Engineered Mosquito Symbiotic Bacteria. in Vector Microbiome and Innate Immunity of Arthropods. vol. 1, Elsevier Inc., pp. 219-234. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-805350-8.00013-1
Wang, Sibao ; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo. / Paratransgenesis Applications : Fighting Malaria With Engineered Mosquito Symbiotic Bacteria. Vector Microbiome and Innate Immunity of Arthropods. Vol. 1 Elsevier Inc., 2017. pp. 219-234
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