Parameters of donor-recipient size mismatch and survival after bilateral lung transplantation

Michael Eberlein, Robert M. Reed, Solbert Permutt, Mayy F. Chahla, Servet Bolukbas, Steven D. Nathan, Aldo Iacono, David B. Pearse, Henry E. Fessler, Ashish S. Shah, Jonathan B. Orens, Roy G. Brower

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between donor-recipient height, gender and predicted estimates of total lung capacity (pTLC) mismatches and post-transplant survival. Methods: The lung transplant databases at three programs were reviewed. The pTLC ratios (donor pTLC/recipient pTLC) and height ratios (donor height/recipient height) were calculated retrospectively. Patients were grouped according to pTLC ratio ≤1.0 or >1.0 and height ratio ≤1.0 or >1.0, and according to gender (mis-)matching. A time-to-event analysis was performed for risk of death after transplantation conditional on 30-day survival using Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazard models. Results: There were 211 adult bilateral lung transplant recipients who qualified for the analysis. Mean follow-up was comparable for all cohorts (range 2.21 to 3.85 years). In the univariate Cox proportional hazard models, a pTLC ratio >1.0 (HR 0.43, p = 0.002) and a height ratio >1.0 (HR 0.61, p = 0.03) were associated with better survival, and a female-donor-to-male-recipient gender mismatch (F-to-M) was associated with worse survival (HR 2.35, p = 0.01). In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model accounting for F-to-M gender mismatch and height ratio >1.0, a pTLC ratio >1.0 remained associated with survival (HR 0.38, p = 0.015). However, accounting for a pTLC ratio >1.0, a height ratio of >1.0 and F-to-M mismatch were not associated with survival. Conclusions: A pTLC ratio >1.0 is associated with improved survival after bilateral lung transplantation. The pTLC ratio might better reflect allograft-thorax mismatch than the height ratio, as it also accounts for effects of gender on lung and thoracic volumes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1213.e7
JournalJournal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

Keywords

  • gender mismatch
  • lung size mismatch
  • lung transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Transplantation

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