Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S protein is necessary for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and cell-cell fusion but not interaction with M protein

Corrin E. McBride, Carolyn E. Machamer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that generally cause mild disease in humans. However, the recently emerged coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) is the most pathogenic human coronavirus discovered to date. The SARS-CoV spike (S) protein mediates virus entry by binding cellular receptors and inducing fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane. Coronavirus S proteins are palmitoylated, which may affect function. Here, we created a non-palmitoylated SARS-CoV S protein by mutating all nine cytoplasmic cysteine residues. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S was required for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and for cell-cell fusion. Surprisingly, however, palmitoylation of S was not required for interaction with SARS-CoV M protein. This contrasts with the requirement for palmitoylation of mouse hepatitis virus S protein for interaction with M protein and may point to important differences in assembly and infectivity of these two coronaviruses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-148
Number of pages10
JournalVirology
Volume405
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Keywords

  • Coronavirus
  • Detergent-resistant membranes
  • Fusion
  • Palmitoylation
  • SARS-CoV
  • Spike
  • Trafficking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S protein is necessary for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and cell-cell fusion but not interaction with M protein'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this